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Also: Lake St. Clair
  Flowering Rush
in the Great Lakes Region

Overview | General Resources | Related Resources
 
Current invaders:
Crustaceans: Rusty Crayfish | Spiny Water Flea
Fish: Goby (Round) | Goby (Tubenose) | Rudd | Ruffe | Sea Lamprey | White Perch
Mollusks: Quagga Mussel | Zebra Mussel
Plants: Curly-leaf Pondweed | Eurasian Watermilfoil | Phragmites (non-native) | Purple Loosestrife
Viruses: Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSv)
 
Potential invaders:
Fish: Asian Carp

[Invasive species home page]

 
What's New
Officials want to destroy invasive plants along Lake Erie
WEWS-NewsChannel5 (10/10)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials are tapping a global-positioning system to map the extent of invasive plants in Lake Erie as part of a national database to spot and track the spread of hardy, unwanted plants.

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Overview
Flowering Rush Flowering Rush (Butomus umbellatus) is a perennial plant from Europe and Asia that was introduced in the Midwest as an ornamental plant. It grows in shallow areas of lakes as an emergent, and as a submersed form in water up to 10 feet deep. Its dense stands crowd out native species like bulrush. The emergent form has pink, umbellate-shaped flowers, and is three feet tall with triangular-shaped stems.
 
Photo Credit: Torbjorn Kronestedt,
courtesy of Minnesota Sea Grant.
 
References: A Field Guide to Aquatic Exotic Plants and Animals, University of Minnesota Sea Grant Program

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General Resources
Exotic Flowering Rush
Minnesota Sea Grant Program
Identification tips and historical information on spread, abundance and control.

Habitattitude
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Adopt a conservation mentality: Protect our environment by not releasing unwanted fish and aquatic plants into the wild. Find out what you can do to help this growing problem on this site.

Invasive Plant Council of New York State
This group provides coordination and guidance on the management of invasive plants to protect biodiversity in New York State. Includes a list of the state's top 20 most invasive species, along with photos, and information on biology, range and habitat.

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Related Resources
GLIN: Agencies and Organizations, Flora
GLIN: Fish and Fisheries in the Great Lakes Region
GLIN: Plants of the Great Lakes Region

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Updated: July 31, 2014
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