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E-M:/ CONGRATULATIONS to Sanborne School, Ossineke, MI!!!



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Enviro-Mich message from asagady@sojourn.com
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From: GROUP PRESS 202-260-4355 <PRESS@epamail.epa.gov>
To: Multiple recipients of list <epa-press@valley.rtpnc.epa.gov>
Subject: PR 19 STUDENT GROUP HONORED WITH THE PRES. ENVIR. YOUTH AWARD
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FOR RELEASE: THURSDAY, MAY 22, 1997


NINETEEN STUDENT GROUPS HONORED WITH THE 
PRESIDENT'S ENVIRONMENTAL YOUTH AWARDS


     Nineteen groups of students from around the U.S. -- including a 
group of Washburn, Mo., fifth graders who helped their school recycle 
25 tons of trash -- were honored today with the 1995 and 1996 
President's Environmental Youth Awards, presented at a Washington, 
D.C., ceremony by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator 
Carol M. Browner.  Introduced in 1971, the awards were created to 
recognize students who take a leadership role in learning about and 
protecting the environment in their local communities. 
     Browner said, "These awards recognize the very best ideas of 
American young people for protecting our environment.  They have not 
only learned about local environmental problems, but helped others to 
learn about them.  Each of these students has put that knowledge to 
work, making extraordinary efforts to ensure that our environment is 
cleaner, safer and healthier for future generations."

     The 19 award recipients, honored at a ceremony co-sponsored by 
EPA and The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co. Inc., are from 
Camarillo, Calif.; Tulare, Calif.; Canon City, Colo.; Madison, Ga.; 
Baker, La.; Portland, Maine; Dorchester, Mass.; OSSINEKE, MICH.; 
Rochester, Minn.; Frederick, Md.; Washburn, Mo.; Bridgewater, N.J.; 
North Arlington, N.J.; Ainsworth, Neb.; Tillamook, Ore.; Morton, Pa.; 
Hixson, Tenn.; Austin, Texas; and Quilcene, Wash.

     Among the winning students were a  group of high school students 
in Tulare, Calif., who spent five years converting an unused portion 
of a school parking lot into a mini-park for the school and the 
community.  The Discovery Outpost produced by third-grade students in 
Baker, La., included mini-habitats such as ponds, a stream and a 
fallen log plus vegetation that provides food for animals.

     The winners, representing elementary through high school 
students, were selected by EPA's 10 regional offices.  Each year, 
contestants submit applications along with summaries of their 
environmental projects to the regional offices.  Each regional panel  
judges  projects on environmental need and appropriateness, 
accomplishment of goals, long-term environmental benefits, positive 
impact on the local community, and the students' project design, 
coordination, implementation, innovation, soundness of approach and 
effectiveness in presenting the project.


     To be eligible for the President's Environmental Youth Award, a 
student must be in grades kindergarten through 12th, have completed an 
environmental project and be sponsored by at least one adult 
representative.

     Lists of the 1995 and 1996 winners are attached, with contacts in 
EPA's regional offices for additional information on specific winners.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS OF THE PRESIDENT'S 
ENVIRONMENTAL YOUTH AWARDS 1995 WINNERS


Region 5
Sanborn School
The Earth Kids - Ossineke, Michigan
Sponsor:  Sandra Kindt
New Awareness - New Lifestyles

The Earth Kids, second graders at Sanborn School, demonstrated several ways
for a community 
without a municipal recycling program to reduce the amount of materials
destined for the landfill.  In 
cooperation with Alpena General Hospital, plastic grocery bags were
collected from students' families, 
staff, and visitors for recycling elsewhere; plastic bottles were converted
into bird feeders; and discarded 
paper was made into gift tags and sold to help fund wildlife recovery
programs.  Partnering with J-Mar, 
a local phone guide company, the students conducted a poster contest with
fourth graders to promote 
recycling outdated phone books, which were converted into hydroseed.
Working with Browning-Ferris 
Industries (BFI), the school collected over 1,400 plastic milk jugs for
recycling into a bench that now 
sits at the school's entrance.  Seeds provided by BFI were planted along the
school's nature path.  Sixth 
graders aided in developing a school compost pile.  Residents saved
newspaper and the kids, with help 
from some adults, transported the paper to a recycling center.  Other
environmental activities included 
building bluebird boxes; observing Monarch butterfly caterpillars and
releasing the subsequent 
butterflies; and presenting an original musical production, "Project,
Rescue, Save the Earth."  For more 
information, contact Suzanne Saric at 312-353-3209.


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Alex J. Sagady & Associates        Email:  asagady@sojourn.com
Environmental Consulting and Database Systems
PO Box 39  East Lansing, MI  48826-0039  
(517) 332-6971 (voice); (517) 332-8987 (fax)


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