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Fwd: E-M:/ new energy efficiency code proposed; falls short of what legislatu.



Just notice that I have been publicly spanked, so it's appropriate to post a
copy of this reply as well:

To:	tflynn@freeway.net

You write: 
1) your disrespect for other is not welcome.
2) ever heard of externalities, or maybe ecological economics?
3) ever thought your god, the "free market", is not really omnipotent?
4) Before you shoot of your email, consider respect, and the legitimate 
views of others.
or 5) keep quiet.

Reply: regarding 1 & 4, yeah, you're right, and I apologize. I had been
dealing all day with some bureaucratic stuff that had me primed, and let it
spill over. Interesting, though, how if I call some Washington people
busybodies that brings down the wrath, but it's apparently OK for many of your
buddies to use far worse terms in deriding Engler and others. What ye sow ye
reap?

Regarding #2, I am a strong believer in internalizing costs. That's not what
an energy code is about, though, and I will continue to oppose such meddling.
I am also a big supporter of voluntary standards ... establish an energy code,
if you want, and then see whether products that meet it can flourish in a free
marketplace. If informed adults reject them, then so be it. Products that need
the force of law to survive are, in my view, not worth having. [A related
subject is how these innocent-sounding government diktats really amount to
corporate welfare, but that's another story.]

Regarding #3, I'm not sure what you mean by "omnipotent" but yes, the market
is indeed all-powerful and the most efficient distributor of scarce goods. Do
you really doubt that? Further, apart from questions of economics, there's
another little issue that would-be controllers seem to forget now and then:
freedom. In a nutshell, my question is this: What gives you or anyone else the
right to tell me that I can't build a house that has "too many" windows? 

In closing, thank you for the response. If you wish to have a conversation I
would be happy to join in.

Regards,

-- BEGIN included message

You write: 
1) your disrespect for other is not welcome.
2) ever heard of externalities, or maybe ecological economics?
3) ever thought your god, the "free market", is not really omnipotent?
4) Before you shoot of your email, consider respect, and the legitimate 
views of others.
or 5) keep quiet.

Reply: regarding 1 & 4, yeah, you're right, and I apologize. I had been
dealing all day with some bureaucratic stuff that had me primed, and let it
spill over. Interesting, though, how if I call some Washington people
busybodies that brings down the wrath, but it's apparently OK for many of your
buddies to use far worse terms in deriding Engler and others. What ye sow ye
reap?

Regarding #2, I am a strong believer in internalizing costs. That's not what
an energy code is about, though, and I will continue to oppose such meddling.
I am also a big supporter of voluntary standards ... establish an energy code,
if you want, and then see whether products that meet it can flourish in a free
marketplace. If informed adults reject them, then so be it. Products that need
the force of law to survive are, in my view, not worth having. [A related
subject is how these innocent-sounding government diktats really amount to
corporate welfare, but that's another story.]

Regarding #3, I'm not sure what you mean by "omnipotent" but yes, the market
is indeed all-powerful and the most efficient distributor of scarce goods. Do
you really doubt that? Further, apart from questions of economics, there's
another little issue that would-be controllers seem to forget now and then:
freedom. In a nutshell, my question is this: What gives you or anyone else the
right to tell me that I can't build a house that has "too many" windows? 

In closing, thank you for the response. If you wish to have a conversation I
would be happy to join in.

Regards,

-- END included message