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E-M:/ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE



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Enviro-Mich message from mmartin@tnc.org
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 2, 1999

Contacts:	Maureen Martin
                517-332-1741 x 33
                         and
                Tom Woiwode
	517-349-7182


		EXEC DIRECTOR TOM WOIWODE LEAVES THE NATURE 
		CONSERVANCY.   CAREER AND CONSERVATION SUCCESSES
		ARE LAUDED BY STAFF, COLLEAGUES AND BOARD.

East Lansing, Michigan

The Nature Conservancy of Michigan today salutes the conservation leadership 
and success of Thomas M. Woiwode, who leaves the organization this week after 
19 years at its helm. Tom, the executive director of The Nature Conservancy of 
Michigan since the chapter's formation in 1980, announced in mid-February that 
he will leave the organization to work with environmental nonprofits in 
capacity building, and to teach nonprofit management at the college level.  

Woiwode, a fixture in Michigan conservation for two decades, has helped to 
create and then manage more than 30 private nature preserves in the state as 
part of The Nature Conservancy's national and international mission to 
preserve rare and representative species and ecosystems around the globe.  The 
Nature Conservancy owns the world's largest network of private nature 
sanctuaries, with 1,600 preserves and nearly a million acres of land in its 
protection portfolio within the United States.  

In celebrations of his career to date and farewell parties in recent weeks, he 
has been lauded for his leadership in the creation of such remarkable places 
as Thompson's Harbor State Park and Grand Mere State Park.  The Nature 
Conservancy, during his tenure, has helped like-minded organizations and 
agencies to preserve more than 60,000 acres of natural lands across the state.

Woiwode spearheaded conservation projects in Michigan that altogether protect 
more than 50 miles of Great Lakes shoreline and more than 100 square miles of 
natural lands - and include a total of more than 16,000 acres of nature 
preserve lands that are today managed by the Conservancy's own stewardship 
staff. Woiwode and his staff have preserved wild lands from the tip of the 
Upper Peninsula's Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior where the Chapter has 
its Horseshoe Harbor Preserve to its Erie Marsh Preserve, bordering Ohio.  

Under the Conservancy's protection in Michigan, rare and native species such 
as the endangered Mitchell's satyr butterfly, American bald eagle and the 
state's new official wildflower, the dwarf lake iris, have been given refuge 
so they can survive. 

"One of his greatest strengths and deepest commitments," according to 
long-time conservation collaborator April Scholtz of the Land Conservancy of 
West Michigan, "has been assisting like-minded conservation partners to expand 
wilderness lands and to protect fragile natural lands. The local land trust 
community in Michigan today is made up of 40 newer, smaller nonprofit land 
conservation organizations.  Most of us, if not all of us, have benefited from 
Tom's teaching and support."

"Tom has taken The Nature Conservancy of Michigan from an office of two-of 
which he was one-twenty years ago to an office of more than 20 experts trained 
in everything from conservation biology to community relations to business," 
says Chuck Aymond, an attorney from Jackson and chairman of the Michigan board 
of trustees for the Conservancy. "The Conservancy is the best trained and most 
effective private conservation organization in the state. And it has been 
Tom's leadership and vision that has made this possible."

Woiwode began his tenure at the Conservancy in June 1980. He has a B.A. and 
M.B.A. from Michigan State University and a J.D. from the Detroit College of 
Law.  He has taught college courses on topics including business and the 
environment and nonprofit management, including teaching as a part of the 
Corporate Environmental Management Program (CEMP) at the University of 
Michigan.  Woiwode's wife, Anne, is the Forestry and Biodiversity Project 
Director for the Sierra Club in Michigan.

Woiwode's last day with The Nature Conservancy is April 2, although he will 
continue to be involved with the organization on a consulting basis.  The 
Conservancy is currently conducting a national search for his successor.  "I 
will miss the daily contact with our staff and many volunteers - but I look 
forward to a new chapter of conservation work.  This is a great time for new 
beginnings,"  Woiwode said today. 

The Nature Conservancy, an international conservation organization whose 
mission is to preserve plants, animals and natural communities that represent 
the biological diversity of the Earth, has protected more than 10 million 
acres in 50 states and Canada and has helped partners in Latin American, the 
Caribbean and Pacific and Asia protect hundreds of millions of wild lands. In 
Michigan, more than 30,000 households contribute as members, donors and 
volunteers, and dozens of companies and foundations provide support to the 
Conservancy's programs here.

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Maureen Martin<mmartin@tnc.org>
Director of Development & Communications, MIFO
The Nature Conservancy

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