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E-M:/ A great speaker series in Grosse Pointe



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Enviro-Mich message from Mary Beth Doyle <marybeth@ecocenter.org>
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LocalMotion has arranged an amazing lecture series of nationally recognized
experts for this coming year.  Speakers scheduled are: Dr. Ted Schettler,
William A. McDonough, Dr. Sandra Steingraber, Steve Lerner, Dr. Devra Lee
Davis, and Dr. Theo Colborn.  So mark your calendars now!
For more information, contact LocalMotion at 734-623-0773.


SAVE THE DATES
Time: 7 o’clock p.m.
      Place: Grosse Pointe War Memorial
     32 Lake Shore Drive
      Cost: $5.00


Toxins in the Environment: Prevention and Solutions
A series of exceptional lectures given by internationally recognized
medical authorities and environmental experts


presented by

LocalMotion
a not-for-profit organization
informing the public about environmental toxins


Lessons from the Children: Health Impacts of Environmental Exposures
Dr. Ted Schettler
January 30, 2001

Dr. Schettler will discuss the unique susceptibility of the developing
baby to a host of common environmental toxins that can lead to a variety of
problems, including impaired immune and reproductive system function as well
as learning disabilities.

Dr. Schettler is co-author of Generations at Risk: Reproductive Health and
the Environment, which examines reproductive and developmental health
effects of exposure to a variety of environmental toxicants. He is also
co-author of In Harm's Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development, which
discusses the impact of environmental exposures on neurological development
in children.

Dr. Schettler has a medical degree from Case-Western Reserve University
and a masters degree in public health from the Harvard School of Public
Health. He is science director for the Science and Environmental Health
Network and co-chair of the Human Health and Environment Project of Greater
Boston Physicians for Social Responsibility. Dr. Schettler is on the medical
staff of Boston Medical Center.


All Sustainability is Local
William A. McDonough
February 28, 2001

Mr. McDonough will discuss the concept of eco-effectiveness, which leads to
human industry that is regenerative rather than depletive. It involves the
design of things that celebrate interdependence with other living systems
and utilizes commerce as the engine of change.

William McDonough, FAIA, internationally acclaimed architect, designer and
educator, is known for his profound approach to design and commerce
incorporating economic intelligence, social equity, and environmental
responsibility. Mr. McDonough is a pioneer in the international "sustainable
development" movement. In 1992 he wrote "The Hannover Principles: Design for
Sustainability," the City of Hannover, Germany's official design guidelines
for EXPO 2000, the World's Fair. The Hannover Principles have become
internationally recognized standards for sustainable design. Time magazine
named Mr. McDonough a ‘Hero for the Planet’ in 1999. In 1996 he received the
Presidential Award for Sustainable Development, the U.S.'s highest
environmental award, presented by President Clinton.

Mr. McDonough's clients include Nike, Herman Miller, Oberlin College, the
Environmental Defense Fund, the Smithsonian Institution, and Ford Motor
Company; Mr. McDonough is redesigning Ford's Rouge plants.

Living Downstream—An Ecologist Looks at Cancer and the Environment
Dr. Sandra Steingraber
March 21, 2001

Heralded for her "inspiring and poetic use of science to elucidate the causes
of cancer," Dr. Steingraber is the author of Living Downstream. Addressing
cancer as a human rights issue, she will use scientific data and personal
stories to discuss the role of pollutants in the nation’s rising cancer
rates.

Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D., ecologist, author, and cancer survivor, is an
internationally recognized expert on the environmental links to cancer.
She received her doctorate in biology from the University of Michigan
and master's degree in English from Illinois State University. She was
recently appointed to serve on President Clinton’s National Action Plan on
Breast Cancer administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services.

In 1999, as part of international treaty negotiations, she briefed U.N.
delegates in Geneva, Switzerland on dioxin contamination of breast milk.


Practical Solutions to Environmental Problems: How Americans Can Meet Their
Needs without Poisoning the Web of Life with Toxic Chemicals
Mr. Steve Lerner
April 25, 2001

One of the country’s foremost speakers on solutions to environmental
problems, Steve Lerner will talk about what some of the most innovative
Americans are doing to reduce our exposure to toxic chemicals and to create a
more sustainable way of meeting our legitimate needs.

Mr. Lerner is Research Director at Commonweal, a 22-year-old health and
environmental research institute in Bolinas, California. He currently runs
the Washington, D.C. office of Commonweal’s Sustainable Future Project. Mr.
Lerner is also a free lance journalist and author.

Mr. Lerner’s most recent book, Eco-Pioneers: Practical Visionaries Solving
Today’s Environmental Problems, profiles the work of 25 Americans who are
coming up with nuts-and-bolts solutions to environmental problems.

Breast Cancer and the Environment: Better Safe than Sorry
Dr. Devra Lee Davis
June 5, 2001

Dr. Davis is an internationally recognized epidemiologist and researcher into
the environmental causes of cancer and chronic disease. She will discuss new
evidence linking breast cancer to environmental risk factors and the case for
the precautionary principle—or why it is better to be safe than sorry.

Dr. Davis currently is a visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, Mt.
Sinai Medical Center, and Cornell Medical Center.  President Clinton
appointed Dr. Davis to the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
Author of over 160 articles, her work has appeared in publications ranging
from Scientific American to the Journal of the American Medical Association
and the Lancet.

Endocrine Disruption: Lessons from the Great Lakes
Dr. Theo Colborn
July 12, 2001

Dr. Colborn, a recognized expert on endocrine-disrupting chemicals, will
discuss toxic substances that interfere with hormones and other chemical
messengers. She will also discuss the transgenerational effects of toxic
chemicals on the developing endocrine, immune, and nervous systems in the
womb and in early childhood. Recent discoveries from human, wildlife, and
laboratory research will be presented.

Dr. Colborn, co-author of Our Stolen Future, serves as Senior Program
Scientist and directs the Wildlife and Contaminants Program at World Wildlife
Fund. Her work has triggered world-wide public concern with endocrine
disruptors, and has prompted enactment of new laws and redirection of
research by governments, the private sector, and academics.

She received her Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison
and speaks regularly to scientific groups, health officials, and policy
makers.

For more information call: LocalMotion: 734-623-0773.



Mary Beth Doyle, MPH
Environmental Health Project
Ecology Center
117 N. Division
Ann Arbor MI 48104

734-663-2400 ext 108
734-663-2414 (fax)




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