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Fwd: Re: E-M:/ Suggestions re turkey fryer oil disposal



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Enviro-Mich message from David Wright <wrightd@voyager.net>
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I am considering purchasing a small diesel vehicle (Volkswagen Passat, 
Rabbit, etc.) which I was planning on running on biodiesel.  The 
volkswagens are listed by EPA at around 50 mpg (which is equivalent to a 
Toyota Prius -- one of the cool new hybrid electric vehicles on the market).

Compared to a gasoline vehicle, diesels produce more nitrogen oxides (NOx) 
and particulate matter  (PM) emissions.  Diesels produce less hydrocarbon 
(HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions.  Also diesel fuel is not as 
volatile as gasoline so there are much lower evaporative hydrocarbon 
emissions from diesels.  And because they tend to get great fuel economy, 
they produce less CO2.  And because most of the carbon in biodiesel comes 
from plants, using biodiesel is not a net adder of carbon into the atmosphere.

All the emission data that I have seen indicate that using biodiesel 
significantly reduces particulate matter emissions and causes a slight 
increase in NOx emissions.  Particulates go down because biodiesel fuel 
does not have sulfur, unlike today's diesel fuels.

When it comes to costs, having looked into biodiesel recently the 3 times 
diesel number is higher, the number I got was closer to 2 times more.

When I looked at costs, I estimated a biodiesel Volkswagen to cost about 
the same as my gasoline Chrysler.  The reason my costs won't change much is 
because my Chrysler gets around 28 mpg compared to the Volkswager that gets 
almost double that value.  So, even though the fuel costs more, because the 
vehicle uses approximately half the amount I'm currently using I will have 
about the same costs.  However, my contribution to global warming emissions 
will decrease and my net ozone and acid rain pollution will be about the 
same.

The UofM is currently running a blend of diesel and biodiesel in all of 
their diesel equipment in Ann Arbor.

Regards,

David Wright



>Delivered-To: enviro-mich-outgoing@glc.org
>Delivered-To: enviro-mich@great-lakes.net
>Date: Wed, 2 May 2001 22:02:05 -0400 (EDT)
>From: Rane Curl <ranecurl@engin.umich.edu>
>To: enviro-mich <enviro-mich@great-lakes.net>
>Subject: Re: E-M:/ Suggestions re turkey fryer oil disposal
>Sender: owner-enviro-mich@great-lakes.net
>Reply-To: Rane Curl <ranecurl@engin.umich.edu>
>List-Name: Enviro-Mich
>X-Loop: enviro-mich
>
>-------------------------------------------------------------------------
>Enviro-Mich message from Rane Curl <ranecurl@engin.umich.edu>
>-------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>On Wed, 2 May 2001, Terry Lodge wrote:
>
> >    Lori, if this is vegetable oil, it could be used as
> > "biodiesel" fuel. Below is a website that contains
> > many links to biodiesel resources:
>...snip...
> > http://www.ohio.sierraclub.org/sprawl/august2000.htm
>
>And here is what the article says about the Sierra Club in
>relation to biodiesel fuels:
>
>     "Sierra Club spokesman Glen Brand said he applauds the experiment, but
>     said it probably would do little to improve the region's air quality.
>
>     "Biodiesel fuels, praised as biodegradable and cleaner-burning than
>     regular diesel, will simply keep dirty diesel engines on the road
>     longer, Brand said."
>
>Besides this, while biodiesel is being investigated, most of the interest
>and funding comes from the agricultural economy, who would like to find
>bigger markets for the production of soybean and other oils.
>
>Also, as the articles indicate, the cost of biodiesel fuels is currently
>three times greater than petroleum based diesel. It would probably remain
>uneconomical as the alcohols required to convert the oils to methyl and
>ethyl ethers themselves cost as much or more than diesel fuels.
>
>Biodiesel does not look like a good prospect for the long term, much less
>the short term, recycling of used cooking oils. The best opportunity for
>recycling these oils would be to clarify and purify them for reuse.
>
>--Rane L. Curl
>
>
>
>
>
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