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Fwd: E-M:/ Harding's policy on groundwater




 Does Harding live in a bubble filled with Nitrous Oxide? 
 He is well aware that LSA, a sand and gravel company in London Township, has 
 been dumping 11-13 million gallons of water a day into the local creek. In 
 the same time, wells are drying up in concentric circles around LSA. Gee, 
 I'll bet Mr. Homeowner is going to have to PROVE the cause of depleting 
 wells. His "suggested legislation" will certainly have verbiage to protect 
 any businesses in the state of Michigan already effecting citizens drinking 
 water.
 Penalize the water bottle industry? That is what he thinks people's goals 
are 
 in stopping the removal of water from the aquifer? If it was the camel 
 waterers industry, or the Harding retirement fund [which it may well be 
 contributing to] would it be any different?
 Laurel and Harding are missing the cause and effect. No wonder he is so 
 ineffective at his job. Environmental Director, he is not. Environmental 
 saboteur fits better. 
 These statements are my personal opinions.
 Jerry Renning
 
 << Director Russell Harding.
  
  The suggested legislation, formulated after months of research, allows 
  state regulators to require a more detailed analysis of hydrogeological 
  impacts when considering groundwater withdrawal applications.
  
  "Abundant groundwater is essential to Michigan's high quality of life," 
  Harding said.  "Its environmental and economic importance demands that we 
  take reasonable steps to ensure that no proposed withdrawal negatively 
  affects sensitive areas such as wetlands, or the private wells of nearby 
  homeowners.  Giving state regulators greater tools to assess all possible 
  impacts is a sensible safeguard.  Most important, this protects the 
  resource without unduly burdening homeowners and industrial users."
  
  Harding expressed concern about a competing plan being pushed by the state 
  Attorney General and various interest groups.
  
  "Penalizing the water-bottling industry, as their plan would do, is an 
  unfair and shortsighted approach," Harding said.  "We must encourage the 
  public and private sectors to work cooperatively for the benefit of our 
  natural resources.  Singling out various business sectors for economic 
  retribution sends a dangerous signal to job providers and does nothing to 
  protect our environment." >>



Does Harding live in a bubble filled with Nitrous Oxide? 
He is well aware that LSA, a sand and gravel company in London Township, has 
been dumping 11-13 million gallons of water a day into the local creek. In 
the same time, wells are drying up in concentric circles around LSA. Gee, 
I'll bet Mr. Homeowner is going to have to PROVE the cause of depleting 
wells. His "suggested legislation" will certainly have verbiage to protect 
any businesses in the state of Michigan already effecting citizens drinking 
water.
Penalize the water bottle industry? That is what he thinks people's goals are 
in stopping the removal of water from the aquifer? If it was the camel 
waterers industry, or the Harding retirement fund [which it may well be 
contributing to] would it be any different?
Laurel and Harding are missing the cause and effect. No wonder he is so 
ineffective at his job. Environmental Director, he is not. Environmental 
saboteur fits better. 
These statements are my personal opinions.
Jerry Renning

<< Director Russell Harding.
 
 The suggested legislation, formulated after months of research, allows 
 state regulators to require a more detailed analysis of hydrogeological 
 impacts when considering groundwater withdrawal applications.
 
 "Abundant groundwater is essential to Michigan's high quality of life," 
 Harding said.  "Its environmental and economic importance demands that we 
 take reasonable steps to ensure that no proposed withdrawal negatively 
 affects sensitive areas such as wetlands, or the private wells of nearby 
 homeowners.  Giving state regulators greater tools to assess all possible 
 impacts is a sensible safeguard.  Most important, this protects the 
 resource without unduly burdening homeowners and industrial users."
 
 Harding expressed concern about a competing plan being pushed by the state 
 Attorney General and various interest groups.
 
 "Penalizing the water-bottling industry, as their plan would do, is an 
 unfair and shortsighted approach," Harding said.  "We must encourage the 
 public and private sectors to work cooperatively for the benefit of our 
 natural resources.  Singling out various business sectors for economic 
 retribution sends a dangerous signal to job providers and does nothing to 
 protect our environment." >>