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E-M:/ from Michelle Hurd Riddick







FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 20, 2002
Contact: Rep. A.T. Frank
Phone: 517-373-1797




Rep. Frank Says State Will Investigate Dioxin Claims,
Credits Local Activists for Calling Attention to Problem

LANSING - The Michigan Departments of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Community Health (DCH) will investigate dioxin levels in Saginaw County following the public outcry over a report about tests taken in the area in 2000 revealing dioxin levels were 80 times higher than the state's residential cleanup standards. "Saginaw County residents have the right to know if toxic substances, such as dioxin, are posing a health threat to the area," Frank said. "I look forward to a meeting with the Department of Environmental Quality to continue looking into the response by the department." Frank said he formally requested a meeting after reading media accounts about dioxin levels that turned up on a farm in the Greenpoint area's flood plain - where the Tittabawassee River meets the Saginaw River. The tests, conducted in April 2000, revealed dioxin levels up to 80 times higher than the state's residential standards. "What alarmed me when I read the media accounts was that the DEQ seemed to be dragging their feet about doing something about these dioxin levels," Frank said. "The department also seemed to not want to inform area residents about the findings, and seemed more concerned with deflecting criticism by issuing denials and downplaying local concerns." Rep. Frank said he would continue to press the DEQ for a formal meeting to discuss the investigation and its outcome. "Dioxin is one of the most toxic substances known," Frank said. "The federal government refers to it as a top public health threat, on the same level as the DDT threat of the 1960s. The Environmental Protection Agency says there appears to be no 'safe' exposure level to dioxin, which makes immediate testing of the Saginaw County site even more urgent." ###








Can you post it on Enviro-Mich?
-----Original Message-----
From: MICHDAVE@aol.com [mailto:MICHDAVE@aol.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2002 05:10 PM
To: terbar@cris.com; dianekhebert@hotmail.com; davemec@voyager.net; tracey@ecocenter.org
Subject: Another try at AT Frank

Sorry, for the mix up...............MHR


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 20, 2002
Contact: Rep. A.T. Frank
Phone: 517-373-1797




Rep. Frank Says State Will Investigate Dioxin Claims,
Credits Local Activists for Calling Attention to Problem

LANSING - The Michigan Departments of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Community Health (DCH) will investigate dioxin levels in Saginaw County following the public outcry over a report about tests taken in the area in 2000 revealing dioxin levels were 80 times higher than the state's residential cleanup standards. "Saginaw County residents have the right to know if toxic substances, such as dioxin, are posing a health threat to the area," Frank said. "I look forward to a meeting with the Department of Environmental Quality to continue looking into the response by the department." Frank said he formally requested a meeting after reading media accounts about dioxin levels that turned up on a farm in the Greenpoint area's flood plain - where the Tittabawassee River meets the Saginaw River. The tests, conducted in April 2000, revealed dioxin levels up to 80 times higher than the state's residential standards. "What alarmed me when I read the media accounts was that the DEQ seemed to be dragging their feet about doing something about these dioxin levels," Frank said. "The department also seemed to not want to inform area residents about the findings, and seemed more concerned with deflecting criticism by issuing denials and downplaying local concerns." Rep. Frank said he would continue to press the DEQ for a formal meeting to discuss the investigation and its outcome. "Dioxin is one of the most toxic substances known," Frank said. "The federal government refers to it as a top public health threat, on the same level as the DDT threat of the 1960s. The Environmental Protection Agency says there appears to be no 'safe' exposure level to dioxin, which makes immediate testing of the Saginaw County site even more urgent." ###