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E-M:/ RE: / Ballast slime hatches Aquatic Invaders



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Enviro-Mich message from "Mark Coscarelli" <mcoscarelli@pscinc.com>
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-----Original Message-----
From: Maryann Whitman [mailto:maryannwhitman2@hotmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2002 8:51 PM
To: enviro-mich@great-lakes.net
Subject: E-M:/ Ballast slime hatches Aquatic Invaders


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Enviro-Mich message from "Maryann Whitman" <maryannwhitman2@hotmail.com>
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There will be no "silver bullet" to solve this vexing problem. Ships
vary in size, class, and configuration, as well as trade patterns, (e.g.
domestic carriers vs. foreign). Ballast water is a different animal than
conventional treatment of point-source discharges, and will require a
suite of control technology that ranges from filtration, ultraviolet,
hydro-clones, biocides, perhaps nitrogen gas, to management practices
and no discharge requirements. The effectiveness of one vessel's ballast
water treatment will not necessarily match that of others. 

A first step is for the federal government (or the region) to adopt a
meaningful discharge standard, performance-based or biological, and
enforce it. Regulation should drive technology, with flexibility built
in to accept something less than zero, over time, until technology and
ship design is able to achieve zero, or close to it. Protracted debate
among scientists, policymakers, and industry groups has distracted us
from the goal and our willingness to come to terms with this issue.  It
will be up to shipping companies, with government in a supporting role,
to employ a "fix" and meet the standard. Many argue that the Clean Water
Act is the vehicle for regulation, which specifically exempts ballast
discharges today.  The Coast Guard is hammering out a standard under the
National Invasive Species Act, and the clock ticks. The perfect solution
has become an enemy of the possible. The debate rages on reducing the
risk, at what cost, and who pays. 

Regards,

Mark Coscarelli
Public Sector Consultants, Inc.
517-371-7461

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BALLAST SLIME HATCHES AQUATIC INVADERS
http://www.glrc.org/story.php3?story_id=1453
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Above is the connection to the glrc story on NPR.  I have a question.  I

recall reading recently that it would be 'easy to remove living
organisms' 
from ballast water by bubbling nitrogen gas through the hold before the 
ballast water is dumped.  My understanding is that aerobic organisms
would 
be deprived of oxygen and would die.

Does anyone know more about this and the possibility of such a practice 
being instituted in the Great Lakes--late as it is?

Maryann Whitman


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=============================================================ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
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