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RE: E-M:/ tires for mulch?



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Enviro-Mich message from "Anne Woiwode" <anne.woiwode@sierraclub.org>
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As I recall, one reason putting tires into a landfill is a problem is that
the tire "floats" to the top, for some reason that I don't understand.  This
may actually help in keeping something on top of a gardening area.  However,
I also recall that one of the components of runoff from streets is basically
tire residue, left from tires rubbing onto the road.

A non-natural inert material for garden beds seems troubling, however, just
as the use of massive amounts of black plastic in landscaping has always
troubled me -- what is the fate of the pieces of tire over time?  Clearly,
the intent is not to collect them after use, so they will persist pretty
much indefinitely.  When they wash out and into waterways, will they present
the same problem that the zillions of plastic things now dotting the
landscape present?  I would guess that is the case, which makes me question
WHY you would want to put them on landscaping?

Anne Woiwode


What an interesting question.

At an MCATS meeting a year ago, a member noted that on her travels
south she had run across tire-chips being used as a mulch at state
roadside facilities.  She said it was highly touted down there (and
I've forgotten where that was).

At first blush, one would think of tire chips as pretty inert.  On the
other hand, I have read that huge mountains of tires which get wet are
subject to spontaneous combustion.  Seems like a compost pile, which
suggests a certain aspect of biodegradeable.

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
---
> Enviro-Mich message from "Savoie, Kathryn"
<KSavoie@accesscommunity.org>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
---
>
> Has anyone heard of using recycled tires as mulch for landscaping?
This is a
> totally new one to me, but it is being marketed to our organization as
> "environmentally friendly," and I have some concerns. Doesn't this
stuff
> degrade, however slowly?  If so, what are the environmental
implications?
> I'd appreciate any information on this topic. Thanks.
>
> Kathryn Savoie, Ph.D.
> Environmental Program Director
> ACCESS
>
> NEW ADDRESS & PHONE:
> 6450 Maple Street
> Dearborn MI  48126
> (313) 216-2225
> ksavoie@accesscommunity.org <mailto:ksavoie@accesscommunity.org>
>
>
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==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action.   Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
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