[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

E-M:/ Dangerous Lake Chemicals - HB 4730 Introduced in Michigan House



Title: Message
Enviro-Michers:  I am forwarding a message I received regarding HB 4730, a bill which as is noted below seems poised to drastically change the control over pesticides and other chemicals used in the control of aquatic nuisance species.  The bill itself, and a tie barred bill HB 4729, can be found on the Michigan Legislature website, www.michiganlegislature.org, by entering the bill number.  I would appreciate any insights and discussion from others on this list.  Anne Woiwode

 
As I read this bill it lets the chemical industry apply chemicals in any lake even if only one owner asks for them,  and even if 99% of those who have property on the lake are opposed.
 
Alert other Michiganers to this dangerous legislation,  call your  Michigan House Member and call your Michigan Senator.   Tell them that HB 4730 is a bad idea.
 
At the very bottom of this message I have reprinted information from the labels on the packages of the two chemicals that are the most heavily used in our lakes by the chemical industry.   It sends chills down my spine.
 
This is  the same bill that was allowed to die in the Senate last year,  because it was so bad for our lakes.  The chemical industry is trying again!!!!
 
Please forward this message to your members who are concerned about dangerous chemicals in our lakes,  and urge them to contact their members of the Michigan House and Michigan Senate.
                                                                                                            *   *   *   
 
The lake chemical industry is pushing HB 4730 through the Michigan Legislature.   The bill essentially eliminates the existing DEQ permit process for applying weed-killing chemicals in Michigan lakes,  and replaces it with a simple notice procedure that allows the chemical applicators to put unlimited amounts of 2, 4D,  Diquat,  Floridone,   and other chemicals in lakes 14 days after they send DEQ a "Declaration of Intent."   
 
The bill has a no-teeth provision for "Lake Management Plans"  or  "Vegetation Management Plans",  essentially saying that if a few folks on a lake want to have chemicals in their lake,  it will be done even if the great majority of riparian owners object.
 
 
The chemical industry just keeps repeating:   "The DEQ has so many  applications to put chemicals in our lakes that they can't get them processed in a timely fashion.   We just have to do away with the DEQ permit program."
 
 
My answer is: 
 
1.  By itself,  the fact that the chemical industry is applying to put dangerous chemicals in over 800 Michigan lakes is a wake-up call.  How many pounds of 2, 4D do they want to put into our lakes and streams?
 
2.  These  (2, 4D,   Diquat,  Floridone)  ARE dangerous chemicals,  you  know.  The Department of Environmental Quality  SHOULD  take the time to carefully check out the applications.
 
3.  Part of the problem is that we have an insufficient number of staff members at the the DEQ.
 
4.  In some cases,  the permit applications take time because there ARE significant risks to the affected communities.   In the case of my home lake (Big Blue,  Muskegon County)  for example,  we have hundreds of children from camps playing in the water,  and we have an active Bald Eagle nest.   Its not black and white.
 
5.  Maybe we should do away with driver's licenses next.
 
As I read this bill it lets the chemical industry apply chemicals in any lake even if only one owner asks for them,  and even if 99% of those who have property on the lake are opposed.
 
Continue to alert other Michiganers to this dangerous legislation,  call your  Michigan House Member and call your Michigan Senator.   Tell them that HB 4730 is a bad idea.
 
 
 
 
 

From the label of  diquat : 

“Do not apply this product in a way that will contact any person or pet,  either directly or through drift....

Clothing exposed to this product should be washed in detergent and hot water.  Such items should ...be washed separately from other laundry.  

Users should wash hands before eating,  drinking,  chewing gum,  using tobacco, or using the toilet. 

Users should remove clothing immediately if pesticide gets inside...

First aid:  If inhaled:  Remove victim to fresh air.  If not breathing,  give artificial respiration,  preferably mouth to mouth.  Get medical attention.

Environmental hazards:  This pesticide is toxic to aquatic invertebrates.  Do not apply directly to water.”

 

From the label of 2, 4D 

Harmful if swallowed.  Avoid contact with eyes,  skin,  or  clothing.  Wear face shield or goggles when mixing,  loading, or applying this product.  After using this product. remove clothing and launder separately before reuse,  and promply and thoroughly wash hands and exposed skin with soap and water. 

Do not apply directly to water or to areas where surface water is present or to intertidal areas below the mean high water mark.

When cleaning equipment do not pour the washwater on the ground.   Spray or drain  over a large area away from wells and other water sources.

Caution should be exercised when handling 2,4D and MCPP pesticides ...to prevent contamination of groundwater supplies.

This product is toxic to aquatic invertebrates.