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E-M:/ Michigan is a major player in GMO lifeform modification, this demandsmore public oversight. Reason? gene escape.



Title:
Michigan, GMO testing ground ZERO.


Dear all,      

Is life simply a pallet to be painted on, molded at the express will of man, will there be no fallout?  The answer is no.

Re: Gene escape.  There is a reason wild populations of rice fish do not glow in the dark.  What is that reason ?
Try and get a straight answer out of a genetic engineer, of  MSU, of the government of the State of Michigan.

Inform yourself , ask (under FOIA) the Michigan Department of Agriculture for a complete list of all GMO plants and animals being grown, tested or marketed  in the State of Michigan, you may be unpleasantly surprised.

The genetic modification of life forms including  food plant and animal resources is unwise even with the best of intentions, and the best of intention are not at work.  A science fiction nightmare future is one possible fate if reason, testing and careful oversight are not applied to this extremely risky technology, and soon.  Below is an example, un-natural glow in the dark fish, will designer children in a complete pallet of pastel colors be far behind?  A cast system, a glow in the dark security benefit, save on energy; take your shirt off !, hey your looking a little dim, brighten up!??!!  This is not a joke, but it is an ethical and moral dilemma that requires public input, a high wire act being done without a net- risking everyone for the benefit of the few, and without the knowledge or permission of most Michigan residents.  Why is the testing for and public reporting of gene escape not taking place?  I have been told the State of Michigan has a staff of 1 (one) to look into this and approve permits, can this be a sincere effort?  Does this make any sense to you?

Please consider asking your elected official for public oversight of GMO efforts in Michigan.

Sincerely,

Samuel M. DeFazio  616-673-2793



Taiwan's glowing fish raises ecological concerns


29 July 2003
By Alice Hung, Reuters


"TAIPEI, Taiwan — When the world's first genetically engineered fish, the glowing "Night Pearl," hit the market two months ago, its Taiwan developer hoped for a sea of profits.

But instead, Taikong Corp dived into a barage of criticism from environmentalists who say the 5 cm (2 inch) fluorescent green fish poses a threat to the earth's ecosystem.

European environmentalists have been protesting against the genetically engineered fish -- injected with a jellyfish gene -- for months, and the Singapore government last week seized hundreds of them being imported, said Fisher Lin, research manager for Taikong, a Taipei-based pet fish breeder turned biotech firm.

"It's difficult to make a genetic engineering breakthrough, but it's even more difficult to commercialise the product," said Lin.

Environmenalists say that if the formerly colourless fresh water ricefish -- which now glows green in the dark -- is released into nature, it could wreak havoc on the ecosystem.

But Lin insists all the transgenic fish developed by Taikong are environmentally safe, as they are sterile.

The introduced gene comes from a natural marine organism and the finished product -- the glowing fish -- is merely protein and harmless to people or other marine creatures, he said.

"The greatest worries about introducing any new GMO (genetically modified organisms) are, first of all, the impact on the ecosystem, and secondly, whether it will cause a threat to human bodies," said Lin.

"We still have high hopes for the transgenic fish and believe they will sell. But we also know people will have a lot of questions," he said.

Taikong has already launched a second transgenic swimmer, a fluorescent purple zebra fish that has been injected with a gene found in coral, and hopes it and the ricefish would swim into aquariums all over the world.

They also plan to introduce multicolour fluorescent pet fish, including red, purple and blue.  "



Source: Reuters

For more information see link below

http://www.enn.com/news/2003-07-29/s_6998.asp