[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

Re: E-M:/ Linseed Oil, Sand and other spirits



-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enviro-Mich message from Lowell Prag <lprag@mail.msen.com>
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Chuck,

The problem and solution is this:

linseed oil polymerizes (forms long chains of tightly bound molecules)
through an oxidation process, using the oxygen in the air. That is why
linseed oil is a good finish for wood, as it penetrates and polymerizes
within the wood.

Therefore, if one wants to preserve gardening tools or other such items,
use it only on the wood handles, not on the metal parts, as it will not
penetrate and as you have learned, you will end up with the mess that you
have created.

To clean up the mess, you need a stronger solvent than mineral spirits.
Get a gallon of paint stripper and soak the tool in a bucket. Then rinse
with water or preferably, lacquer thinner, as water tends to emulsify the
stripper residue, rather than dissolve it.

Last, be sure to note that any rags used for applying the linseed oil,
will ignite with spontaneous combustion, through the heat created by the
oxidation process. So, dispose of them safely.

Lowell Prag

On Sun, 7 Dec 2003, positive wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Enviro-Mich message from positive <positive@iserv.net>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Someone showed me a magazine article about a method of oiling hand
> garden tools by mixing oil and sand in a bucket, and dipping the tools
> before putting them away for the winter.
>
> I substituted a quart of linseed oil for motor oil. It mixed about as
> easily as cement. I left a shovel in the bucket overnight. Although it
> didn't get below freezing, next day the mixture was nearly solid, and it
> took a long time to chisel the shovel out.
>
> I tried pouring mineral spirits, as a solvent, on the chunks of hardened
> sand. It seemed to soften the chunks somewhat, but after a gallon of
> mineral spirits I gave up. I guess I didn't use water because I was
> still hoping it would work, and water obviously would contribute nothing
> but rust.
>
> Does anyone know what went wrong? Why did the sand harden? And what do I
> do with this mess now -- is it hazardous waste because of the "petroleum
> distillates" in the mineral spirits? The local hazardous waste authority
> thought it could be disposed of with regular waste.
>
> Chuck Neller
>
>
>
> ==============================================================
> ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
> and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action.   Archives at
> http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/
>
> Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
> majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
> ==============================================================
>


==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action.   Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================