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Re: E-M:/ FW: Governor signs lead poisoning bill



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Enviro-Mich message from skyprice@iserv.net
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In relation to this, Grand Rapids' "Get the Lead Out" program, headed up
by Paul Haan, is doing a great job in addressing this huge problem. The
initiative came out of the Aquinas College Community Leadership Institute,
which Grand Rapids' wonderful environmentally-friendly mayor George
Heartwell directs. Just wanted to give Paul and his program accolades --
though I see some information about what's going on in Detroit area, I
haven't seen much about the Grand Rapids effort.

Cynthia Price
Greater Grand Rapids Food Systems Council

> Michigan:  FYI.  -RJ.
>
> ************************
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: gov_office@MICHIGAN.GOV [mailto:gov_office@MICHIGAN.GOV]
> Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2004 12:02 PM
> To: GOV-NL@LISTSERV.MICHIGAN.GOV
> Subject: Governor signs lead poisoning bill
>
>
>
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
>
> December 21, 2004
>
>
>
> Governor Granholm Signs New Laws Aimed at Helping Families Avoid Lead
> Poisoning
>
>
>
> LANSING - Governor Jennifer M. Granholm today signed four new laws aimed
> at helping families avoid living in houses that may contain lead-based
> paint which can poison young children and hinder their intellectual and
> physical development.
>
>
>
> "These new measures will help prevent more children from being sickened
> by lead poisoning," Granholm said.  "Families need to know if they are
> exposing their children to lead poison, because it is 100 percent
> incurable but 100 percent preventable."
>
>
>
> According to a 2003 state report, as many as 20,000 Michigan children
> under the age of six may be affected by lead poisoning.  The report
> called for a comprehensive approach to focusing on prevention, public
> awareness, increased screening, and improved rental housing.
>
>
>
> The laws signed today by Governor Granholm complete an effort the
> Governor has championed since taking office.  Earlier this year, the
> Governor signed three new laws that increase screening for lead
> poisoning in children and improve the processing of test results.
>
>
>
> "Our state has come together on this issue like never before," said Dr.
> Kimberlydawn Wisdom, Michigan's surgeon general.  "With grassroots
> efforts, bipartisan cooperation, budgetary support, and statewide
> collaboration, we can now say with confidence that we are better
> equipped to eliminate the number one childhood environmental health
> hazard by the year 2010."
>
>
>
> Today, the Governor signed four new laws.  They include:
>
>
>
> . Senate Bill 753, sponsored by Senator Martha G. Scott (D-Highland
> Park), establishing a Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control
> Commission that will have nine voting members.  This new law takes
> immediate effect.
>
>
>
> . Senate Bill 756, sponsored by Senator Bill Hardiman (R-Grand Rapids),
> establishing a Lead Safe Housing Registry to list residential and
> multifamily dwellings and child-occupied facilities that have been
> abated of lead-based paint hazards or have had interim controls
> performed to control lead-based paint hazards.  The registry will be
> maintained by the Department of Community Health in conjunction with the
> Family Independence Agency and published on the DCH Web site.  This new
> law takes immediate effect.
>
>
>
> . Senate Bill 757, sponsored by Senator Hansen Clarke (D-Detroit),
> prohibiting rental agents, landlords, or owners from renting or leasing
> a rental unit to another person if they had prior knowledge that that
> unit contained a lead-based paint hazard or if they were notified of a
> hazard during the rental period and did not take action within 30 days
> to abate it.  This new law takes effect on January 2, 2005.
>
>
>
> . House Bill 5116, sponsored by Representative Randy Richardville
> (R-Monroe), also establishing the Lead Safe Housing Registry.  This new
> law takes immediate effect.
>
>
>
> Lead is a toxin that builds up in the body when it is ingested.
> Children often are exposed to lead through cracking, peeling, lead-based
> paint in older buildings.  Lead-based paints were banned more than 30
> years ago, but many older homes and buildings still have remnants of the
> paint on walls or trim.  People of any age can be adversely affected by
> lead exposure, but young children are especially vulnerable, because
> their brains are still developing.
>
>
>
> In Michigan, the highest incidences of lead poisoning are in the
> counties of Wayne, Kent, Muskegon, Berrien, Calhoun, Kalamazoo, Genesee,
> Ingham, Saginaw, and Oakland.  Cities of particular concern are Detroit,
> where 63 percent of the houses were built prior to 1950, and Grand
> Rapids, which has the highest concentration of lead poisoning in the
> state.  In some areas of Detroit, children have blood lead levels up to
> 10 times the national average.
>
>
>
> # # #
>
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>
>
>
>



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