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E-M:/ "National Model" Ohio Vote Fraud; War is Peace, Slavery is Freedom, Ignorance is Strength



Title: Dow dioxin contamination featured in Detroit Free Pres
We can't expect success in preserving what is left of our environmental health and welfare, under circumstances where authorities can get away with outrageous statements like this:
 
"Blackwell spokesman Carlo LoParo dismissed the accusations as baseless. He said Ohio's performance on Election Day was a national model. 'Ohio actually leads the pack in election administration and trouble-free voting,' [Give me a break!] he said. 'You start to think that the truth is a foreign language to Rev. Jackson.'"
 
 
Published on Tuesday, January 4, 2004 by the Cleveland Plain Dealer (Ohio)
End Challenge to Bush's Win, Bush/Cheney Lawyers Urge Ohio High Court
by Julie Carr Smyth
 

COLUMBUS -- Lawyers for the Bush campaign asked Ohio's high court Monday to throw out a legal challenge to the president's re-election, even as protesters accelerated accusations of widespread mistakes and manipulation.


Regardless of the outcome of the lawsuit, Jackson called for an investigation into the election that would include deposing Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, Ohio's chief elections official. He said "the pattern of anomalies in Ohio -- and Pennsylvania and Florida -- amount to a plan" and that Blackwell should be held responsible.

The Bush-Cheney regional chairwoman, JoAnn Davidson, said two months is long enough for the Republican victors to withstand protesters, whose public claims and multiple legal actions she characterized as frivolous and unsubstantiated.

************

But the announcement did little to deter a coalition of activist groups questioning the election.

Some 500 people rallied in the theater at the Verne Riffe Center across the street from the Statehouse for a cause dubbed "Demand Democracy."

With just days before Congress is set to certify the election, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Democratic Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones continued their efforts to keep Ohio's election in the spotlight. They are seeking support in the U.S. House and Senate to oppose certifying the results on Thursday.

************ 

Coalition attorney Peter Peckarsky said that significant deviations from expert exit polling by a renowned international pollster provide the clear and convincing evidence required for the Ohio Supreme Court to uphold the election challenge and revisit the vote. He said swings so radically outside the margin of error would be cause for concern in Ukraine or Iraq, but seemingly aren't in America.

"Anywhere else on the face of the planet, the people would know that they were victims of an election fraud," he said.

Regardless of the outcome of the lawsuit, Jackson called for an investigation into the election that would include deposing Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, Ohio's chief elections official. He said "the pattern of anomalies in Ohio -- and Pennsylvania and Florida -- amount to a plan" and that Blackwell should be held responsible.

Blackwell spokesman Carlo LoParo dismissed the accusations as baseless. He said Ohio's performance on Election Day was a national model.

"Ohio actually leads the pack in election administration and trouble-free voting," he said. "You start to think that the truth is a foreign language to Rev. Jackson."

© Copyright 2005 The Plain Dealer

Tom Stephens
Guild/Sugar Law Center
733 St. Antoine, 3rd Floor
Detroit, Michigan 48226 USA
(313) 962-6540
(Fax) (313) 962-4492
tstephens@sugarlaw.org
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, September 29, 2004 4:40 PM
Subject: E-M:/ Dow dioxin contamination featured in Detroit Free Press today

A series of informative stories on the Dow/dioxin issue is featured in the Free Press today, penned by Hugh McDiarmid, Jr.

Battle rages over cleanup of Dow's toxic legacy
September 29, 2004
BY HUGH McDIARMID JR.
FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

MIDLAND -- Winding lazily through parks and backyards, the Tittabawassee River valley is a postcard-perfect place. Deer drink from the river, walleye course along its bottom, and wild turkeys peck along the water's edge.

But an invisible danger is infused in its sandy banks and gritty bottom.

Dioxins -- chemicals that gained international infamy for their role in the evacuation of hundreds of families in places like Love Canal, N.Y., and Times Beach, Mo., a generation ago -- have contaminated wildlife, threatened the health of riverfront residents and created a political firestorm pitting the state against the nation's largest chemical producer.


Data from studies spun to support different agendas
September 29, 2004
BY HUGH McDIARMID JR.
FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

"Sound science" is the buzzword of choice in the dioxin cleanup debate.

What it means depends on who's talking.

Usually, it implies state regulators use arbitrary science in veering toward a costly and unnecessarily intrusive dioxin cleanup on Dow Chemical Co. For others, it suggests Dow is stubbornly refusing to take responsibility for a dangerous toxic legacy.

But even the soundest science is subject to self-serving, selective interpretation.

In politics, it's called spin.

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What are dioxins, and why should we care?
September 29, 2004
BY HUGH McDIARMID JR.
FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

What are dioxins?

First identified by scientists more than 40 years ago, dioxins largely are the by-products of industrial processes including incineration and chemical manufacturing. Natural combustion, such as forest fires and volcanoes, also produce small amounts. Until their discovery and the subsequent environmental laws of the 1970s, industries released them unchecked into the air and water. After release, they settle into soil and sediment at the bottom of rivers and lakes, gradually working their way up the food chain. The term dioxin is used for a family of chlorinated chemical compounds. Can we see them?

No. Dioxins are so potent they are measured in parts per trillion. One part per trillion is roughly equivalent to one square foot of land in the state of Indiana.

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