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E-M:/ Great Lakes fish reduce sperm production & fertility in mice



Title: Great Lakes fish reduce sperm production & fertility i
New study:  Mice fed Great Lakes fish diet had:
Greater neonatal mortality and lesser body weights in male mice
Lesser fecundity in male mice
Fertilizing ability of sperm decreased 10%
Sperm motility, velocity, linearity and amplitude of lateral head displacement were also decreased


Chou, K., Lin, C.-Y., Huang, A., Inglis, R., Lin, S., 2002.  Great Lakes' contaminants reduce sperm production and fertilizing ability in mice. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 7: 231-239.

Abstract
The long-term effects of Great Lakes' contaminants on male reproductive performance resulting from lactational and dietary exposure were investigated. Female C57BL/6 J mice (F-0) were mated with DBA/2 J male mice to produce B6D2F1 offspring. Dams (F-0) were fed one of three treatment diets during lactation. The three treatment diets were: (i) diet C, containing lab chow and fish oil; (ii) diet I, containing 60% Iowa carp and 40% lab chow; and (iii) diet G, containing 60% Great Lakes' carp and 40% lab chow. Diet C served as a lab-chow control treatment, while diet I served as a fish-diet control treatment. Diet G contained 2500 mg of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 300 mg of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-[p- chlorophenyl]ethylene (4,4'-DDE) per kilogram of feed. The offspring (F-1) were continued on their respective maternal treatment diets from weaning until termination. Greater neonatal mortality and lesser body weights were observed in the F-1 male mice on diet G. Lesser fecundity was observed in one-year-old F-1 male mice on diet G following pairing with non-treated female mice. The sperm concentration of F-1 male mice on diet G was less than 30% of that of mice on diets C and I. The in vitro fertilizing ability of the sperm decreased to 10% of that of mice on the two control diets. Sperm motility, velocity, linearity and amplitude of lateral head (ALH) displacement were also decreased in 15-month-old F-1 male mice on diet G.