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E-M:/ FW: Governor underscores importance of agriculture



From: gov_office@MICHIGAN.GOV [mailto:gov_office@MICHIGAN.GOV]
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2005 12:31 PM
To: GOV-NL@LISTSERV.MICHIGAN.GOV
Subject: Governor underscores importance of agriculture

 

Governor Granholm Underscores Importance of Agriculture to Michigan’s Economy in Weekly Radio Address

 

LANSING – In her weekly radio address, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm today underscored the importance of Michigan’s agriculture industry, valued at $37 billion a year and employing half a million Michigan citizens.

           

“We are a state of high-tech auto manufacturers, but we’re also a state of high-tech farms,” Granholm said today.  “We are proud to be the second-most diverse state in the nation in agricultural commodities, from our wide variety of field crops to specialty crops like cherries and blueberries and asparagus.”

           

Granholm noted that the Administration is working to make sure farmers continue to thrive in Michigan.

           

Since 2003, the state has opened eight new Agricultural Processing Renaissance Zones in areas like Calhoun, Ottawa and Ontonagon counties, all of which help Michigan’s second largest industry create jobs and increase investment by establishing tax free areas.  The Governor also cited a Community Development Block Grant for Boar’s Head Provisions in Holland Charter Township awarded earlier this year that will help the company expand its food production facilities and create 115 new jobs as a result.

 

The Governor’s address followed a week in which she paid tribute to agriculture with visits to the Michigan State Fair, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in the city of Detroit, and the Upper Peninsula State Fair in Escanaba.

           

“We are blessed in Michigan with abundant natural resources, with a great agricultural heritage, and with hard working people who sustain this critical industry,” Granholm said.  “This week was a great reminder that we have to continue our work to support them and to help our farmers and agricultural processors succeed in the  21st century.”

           

The Governor’s weekly address is released each Friday at 10:00 a.m. and may be heard on broadcast stations across the state through an affiliation with the Michigan Association of Broadcasters.  The address will also be available on the Governor’s Website on Mondays as a podcast for general distribution to personal MP3 players and home computers.

 

Broadcasters Note: Governor Granholm’s radio address can be accessed through Sunday evening exclusively through the Members Only Page of the Michigan Association of Broadcasters website: www.michmab.com.

 

Publishers Note: The text of today’s address follows.       

 

___________________

 

GOVERNOR JENNIFER M. GRANHOLM

Radio Address – Agriculture and Michigan’s economy

Record Date: August 17, 2005

Release Date: August 19, 2005

 

 

Hello, this is Governor Jennifer Granholm.

 

One of the best family outings in Michigan during the late summer or fall is at one of our great Michigan fairs, such as the Peach Festival in Romeo or the Posen Potato Festival.

 

I had the privilege of traveling to the UP State Fair this past week in Escanaba – and I was also at the State Fair in the Lower Peninsula to celebrate a Michigan milestone: the 100th anniversary of the fair’s location in the city of Detroit.

 

This is a great source of pride for Michigan, because we are the only state in the nation to hold a statewide fair in a major urban center.

 

The tradition goes back a century, but what hasn’t changed in all that time is how vital agriculture is to our economy and to our everyday lives, no matter which peninsula or which corner of Michigan you call home.

 

We are a state of high-tech auto manufacturers, but we’re also a state of high-tech farms.  We have towering cityscapes and breathtaking landscapes.  We’re a state of vineyards and stockyards, of combines and canneries and carburetors. 

 

Agriculture is Michigan’s second largest industry, valued at $37 billion a year and employing half a million Michigan citizens. 

 

We are proud to be the second most diverse state in the nation in agricultural commodities, from our wide variety of field crops to specialty crops like cherries and blueberries and asparagus. 

 

And we are working to make sure that farmers continue to thrive in Michigan.

 

Since 2003, we’ve opened eight new Agricultural Processing Renaissance Zones in areas like Calhoun County, Ottawa County and Ontonagon County, all of which help the agriculture industry create jobs and increase investment by establishing tax free areas.

 

And, for example, thanks to a new Community Development Block Grant we announced just this year, Boar’s Head Provisions in Holland Charter Township is expanding its food production facilities where they’ll create 115 new jobs as a result.

 

These steps and so many others are good for business.  But they also protect our valuable farmland. 

 

This is so important for Michigan, and it’s why my Administration has acted to make sure that over 4,000 acres of prime apple and peach farmland will be protected for generations.

 

We are blessed in Michigan with abundant natural resources, with a great agricultural heritage, and with hard working people who sustain this critical industry.  And this week was a great reminder that we have to continue our work to support them and to help our farmers and agricultural processors succeed in the 21st century.

 

Thank you for listening.