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E-M:/ MASS MARCH ON WALL ST. - NYC - NON-VIOLENT/DIRECT ACTION



EMers,

I pass this on from Chris Brown, Michigan activist & Attorney. . . .if any environmental group reading this desires to join as a cosponsor/organizer, contact Chris at cbrown@MICHIGANLEGAL.ORG

Brian

MASS MARCH ON WALL STREET DECEMBER 1, 2005

WE MUST TURN OUR OUTRAGE OVER KATRINA INTO A MOVEMENT On the 50th
Anniversary of Dec. 1, 1955, the day in Montgomery Alabama that Rosa Parks
sparked the modern Civil Rights Movement -- A Call for

A NATIONWIDE STRIKE AGAINST

POVERTY, RACISM & WAR

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1

NO SCHOOL - NO SHOPPING - NO WORK

CONTINUED PROTEST AND TEACH-INS THROUGH DECEMBER 2 AND 3

M A S S M A R C H O N W A L L S T. NYC

JUSTICE FOR THE PEOPLE OF NEW ORLEANS &THE GULF STATES

A JOB AT A LIVING WAGE IS A HUMAN RIGHT

BRING THE TROOPS HOME NOW

HEALTHCARE, HOUSING AND EDUCATION NOT WAR AND OCCUPATION

The Outrage in New Orleans is a clarion call to the antiwar movement and the
grassroots:

The time has arrived to take our struggle to a higher level. Let us work
together and organize a nationwide strike against Poverty, Racism and War on
Dec. 1, 2005, the 50th anniversary of the day that Rosa Parks helped launch
the modern civil rights movement - no work, school, or shopping - continued
protest through Dec.2 and 3 - A MASS MARCH ON WALL ST. NYC. It is time for
the people to demonstrate that they can stop business as usual
coast-to-coast when justice requires the people to do so.

We owe it to the victims of Katrina, to poor and working people, to the
world and to ourselves to find the way to help turn the outrage over Katrina
into a mass grassroots movement for social justice, the likes of which this
country has not seen for some time. Moreover, it is vitally necessary, and
much more possible now, to forge real unity on a phenomenal scale between
the movement against the war and the movements of African Americans, people
of color, and poor and working people in a struggle for economic, social and
political rights.

The war and occupation of Iraq and the Katrina outrage have demonstrated to
the world the urgent necessity for fundamental change and a movement that is
big enough and determined enough to achieve the goal. Katrina has exposed
the ugly truths about class and race, poverty, war and militarism. Our
solidarity with demands of the survivors of Katrina must evolve from
empathy, charity and symbolism to a mighty social force to be reckoned with.
Key to this mighty potential will be the forging of a strong alliance with
activists and leaders within the African American community in the Gulf
States, taking direction from them regarding the kind of solidarity that
they need and the demands they are making. Our demand to end the war in Iraq
and to bring the troops home now must be backed up by the kind of mass
tactics that signal that we mean business.

Fifty years ago, Black people in Montgomery, Alabama were forced by law to
sit in the back of public buses, and give their seats to any white person
who demanded it. When Rosa Parks, a garment worker and civil rights
activist, refused to give up her seat to a white man, she sparked the
Montgomery bus boycott against segregation on public buses, one of the most
successful and truly mass boycotts in history. The Montgomery bus boycott
also introduced to the world a young reverend named Martin Luther King Jr.,
who became the boycott's principal public leader.

A Dec. 1 Strike Working Committee was set up at a Sept. 10 Natl. Strategy
Meeting of the Troops Out Now Coalition

(TONC) attended by more than 100 activists. The working committee will
develop outreach and building plans for the Dec. 1 strike.

Dec. 1 Nationwide strike against poverty, racism and war

-- INITIATING ORGANIZATIONS: Troops Out Now Coalition, Million Worker March
Movement, Teamsters National Black Caucus, Michigan Emergency Committee
Against War & Injustice.