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E-M:/ your DJ is flat-out wrong



Word through the grapevine ....

...this morning around 9:45 on 103.5 WMUZ

The DJ was saying: "It doesn't matter if they drill in the artic refuge .. . nobody goes there anyway, . .. "


The above is irresponsible commentary.

1) We can't drill our way to energy independence; making cars /trucks more fuel efficient would save way more than could be obtained by drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).

2) ANWR is an irreplaceable ecological treasure; drilling there would be an ecological desecration.

3) Desecration is an apt term, because the indigenous people who live up there (the Gwich'in ..7,000 strong) call the area "the sacred place where life begins" and depend on it in cultural, religious, and subsistence ways.

4) Many in the religious community (myself included) have been calling for protection of ANWR for years, because of our concern for the beauty and ecological integrity of this wilderness area and its myriad creatures AND because of our conviction that it is a matter of justice for the Gwich'in people, to keep oil drilling out of the Coastal Plain of the Refuge (the area that is the biological heart of the refuge and the historic calving grounds of the Porcupine Caribou herd ..
Gwich'in means "caribou people").

5) We need to wean ourselves away from such an addiction to fossil fuels that we would go ANYWHERE, even a pristine place like ANWR.  And we need to move to cleaner, alternative, more efficient fuels, to help slow human-caused global warming / climate change through our ever-increasing CO2 emissions.

6) For years now, polls have shown that the majority of Americans do NOT support drilling there or in other sensitive areas.  To attempt to open ANWR to drilling by slipping it into a budget bill is shameless and inexcusable.  Thankfully, moderate Republicans succeeded in removing it, at least for the moment.

7)  The Arctic Refuge IS a place where some people go; all reports are that it is magnificent.  It's also the sort of place that is so special, that just knowing it exists, and is safe from environmental degradation, can be enough for most of us. 
And generations to come will thank us for saving it.


Kim Winchell
Diaconal Minister for Earthkeeping Education
North / West Lower MI Synod
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America