[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

E-M:/ Over consumption + Disconnection from Nature



-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enviro-Mich message from Christopher Bedford <chrisbedford@charter.net>
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Terry, Craig, Eric and the Michigan Enviro Masses,

The issue of over consumption has to do with hunger ---
hunger for enough nutrition to be healthy,
hunger for a world that acknowledges our spiritual connections as well as our financial connections.
I believe, a diet anchored on local food production produced in an ecological sound manner, in a way that respects Nature, will help end our quest to fulfill some of our "hunger".
Further, if we engage in this local food system ourselves, growing some food, joining with neighbors and farmers at markets, cooking fresh food, I think we will reconnect with Nature.
And that will, in my belief, help alleviate some of the spiritual hunger that drives us to the Mall in search of stylish material alternatives.


Eating right is about everything.
Such a simple turn in our behavior could have profound affects on the natural and our human world.


Chris Bedford

On Mar 23, 2006, at 12:23 PM, Link, Terry wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------------- --
Enviro-Mich message from "Link, Terry" <link@mail.lib.msu.edu>
----------------------------------------------------------------------- --


As a follow-up to Craig's note, historian Howard Zinn has a piece on just that point published this week by the Progressive and available at

http://www.commondreams.org/views06/0321-20.htm



Terry Link, Director
Office of Campus Sustainability
Michigan State University
106 Olds Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824
1-517-355-1751 (Phone/fax)
link@msu.edu
www.ecofoot.msu.edu

One planet, one family, one future

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-enviro-mich@great-lakes.net [mailto:owner-enviro-mich@great-lakes.net] On Behalf Of harrisc
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:50 AM
To: 'Eric Sun'; 'enviro Mich'
Subject: E-M:/ RE: / Possible Cultural Roots that make it difficult to reduce over-consumption?


----------------------------------------------------------------------- --
Enviro-Mich message from "harrisc" <Craig.Harris@ssc.msu.edu>
----------------------------------------------------------------------- --


it occurs to me that one way to counter the assumption and develop awareness
would be to teach u.s. history better . . .
if the history of westward expansion and the globalization that followed the
closing of the frontier could be taught in ways that emphasized the costs to
indigenous peoples and their natural capital, perhaps then u.s. consumers at
least would realize that u.s. growth has always been paid for by the costs
of reduced well-being borne by people in other nations and societies . . .
it is my sense that these things are not, in general, currently covered as
part of the teaching of u.s. history . . .
cheers,
craig


craig k harris
department of sociology
michigan agricultural experiment station
national food safety and toxicology center
institute for food and agricultural standards
michigan state university
http://www.msu.edu/~harrisc/


-----Original Message----- From: owner-enviro-mich@great-lakes.net [mailto:owner-enviro-mich@great-lakes.net] On Behalf Of Eric Sun Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2006 1:38 PM To: enviro Mich Subject: E-M:/ Possible Cultural Roots that make it difficult to reduce over-consumption?

----------------------------------------------------------------------- --
Enviro-Mich message from Eric Sun <esun.mba2001@ivey.ca>
----------------------------------------------------------------------- --


I cannot help but think that one aspect of the "There's always more
resources" assumption that makes us think that we can consume more lies in
the history of the westward expansion from the 13 original states.
Too crowded in New York or Philly? "Go west, young man!" to greener
pastures and a new life. Over time, the lack of pressure to change habits
because one could easily exploit virgin territory a short walk away might
have enshrined this attititude that assumed there was plentiful resources at
one's beck and call.


How can we counter this "Assumption of Plenty" and replace it with the
awarenss of a "Myth of Plenty"
since cirsumstances have changed (i.e., we cannot expand west anymore...),
when the former is so ingrained in the American psyche, perhaps on an
unspoken level?


While the environmental footprint illustrates conceptually a person's impact
on their surroundings, how can we demonstrate this in tangible, experiential
ways that capture the attention and imagination of men and women without
alienating them?


Eric Sun

Sidebar:
In this way the movie "Independence Day" was an environmental movie with the
over-consumptive aliens the evil force to be fought against....


--- Roger Kuhlman <rokuhlman@yahoo.com> wrote:


Of course environmental problems in the United States are due to both over-consumption and over-population. Reducing over-consumption to sustainable levels is an extremely difficult problem. America has never voluntarily reduced its consumption in its history and the cuts in consumption required to get to sustainable levels would be massive. Just try telling people that their standard of living must drop steeply. They just will not do it.

On the other hand since population growth in America is 90% caused by
excessive immigration, it can be controlled. First you stop illegal
immigration entirely and then reduce legal immigration to low
pre-1965 levels of 100,000 per year. With low native birthrates, the
population will then stabilize on its own. Long-term you plan national
population policy to aim at lower human numbers in the more distant
future
(75 to 150 years out). With a smaller population base to support,
controls on consumption become less problematic.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

--- William Tobler <williamtobler@critterswoods.org>
wrote:

Of course it is both.

Do you really think that you are going to get Joe Public to cut his
consumption to a significant percentage?
Do you really think that this is a solution other than a short delay
of the inevitable?
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Jan O'Connell
  To: TANYA J CABALA ; John Rohe ; Lowell Prag ; enviro Mich
  Sent: Saturday, March 18, 2006 10:01 PM
  Subject: Re: E-M:/ Re: Roger Kuhlman's pet peeve ...


I can certainly concur with Tanya here. The problem with the United States, I would say is
more
with
  consumption rather than population.   I believe
we
have 4-5% of the world's population here in the
U.S.

and consume 24% of the world's energy.


  Jan O'Connell
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: TANYA J CABALA
    To: John Rohe ; Lowell Prag ; enviro Mich
    Sent: Saturday, March 18, 2006 5:03 PM
----------------------------------------------------------------------- --

I still believe that we need to look at population more from a global perspective, than strictly from our own country's perspective. It's the planet that has the overpopulation problem,
not
just the United States.  If
    we were truly serious about world overpopulation, we would be
focusing our
    efforts at improving our policies relating to contraceptives in
developing
    countries and greatly increasing the ability
of
women everywhere to take
    control of their reproductive rates.    The
majority of women in the United
    States have that control in the United States and I believe that
is the
    reason our birth rates have decreased.

Tanya Cabala

-----Original Message-----




----------------------------------------------------------------------- --
    Enviro-Mich message from "John Rohe"
<john@rohemail.com>



Lowell Prag asks Roger Kuhlman: Is it
necessary
to keep posting your
    predictions on population, as an appendage to other peoples
postings not
    directly a thread related to your pet peeve?
It
is really getting tiresome.

    Lowell, As a citizen with a concern over our legacy, I wonder
whether you
    might be willing to dignify Kuhlman's pet
peeve
with your input on the
    optimum level of immigration for a sub-replacement level
fertility nation,
    like the United States. You might prefer to ignore Kuhlman's pet
peeve, but
    the issue will not ignore you. We inhabit a planet having a net
gain of over
    200,000 every day (yes, that's births minus deaths, daily). What
is the best
    level of immigration for the nation today? Or, do you suggest
that we just
    ignore the issue and let the foot traffic at
the
border determine this vital
    issue for your children? John Rohe

Eric Sun c: 416.832.1594 e: esun.mba2001@ivey.ca

==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH: Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action. Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/


Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info
enviro-mich"
==============================================================



==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH: Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action. Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/


Postings to: enviro-mich@great-lakes.net For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net with a one-line message body of "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================


==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH: Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action. Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/


Postings to: enviro-mich@great-lakes.net For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net with a one-line message body of "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================



Christopher B. Bedford
President
Sweetwater Local Foods Market
#6543 Hancock Road
Montague, MI 49437
231-893-3937 (o)
231-670-4817 (c)
chrisbedford@charter.net

The Sweetwater Local Foods Market is Michigan's FIRST Farmers Market to exclusively sell humanely raised animal products and chemical-free/Certified Organic fruits and vegetables. The 2006 Market Season begins on Saturday, June 3rd at a new location.

The market is located In the overflow parking lot of Great Lakes Downs at the corner of Ellis and Harvey Roads - 1/4 mile down from the new Meijers on Harvey near the Lake Shore Mall.

==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action.   Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================