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E-M:/ Consumers looking to pump more CO2 into atmosphere



The story fails to note is that both Consumers and Detroit Edison have recently dropped their forecast demands sharply.
See a graphic showing the big drop in forecast demand at http://www.dleg.state.mi.us/mpsc/electric/capacity/energyplan/updatedforecasts_jun22_2006.pdf

And learn more about the 21st Century Energy Plan being developed at
http://www.dleg.state.mi.us/mpsc/electric/capacity/energyplan/index.htm
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Consumers might expand local plant

Consumers might expand local plant

Bay City Times
By Jeff Kart
  But Michigan needs more power, and some state regulators say the
utility is considering an expansion of the Karn-Weadock power plant
complex at the mouth of the Saginaw River.
http://www.mlive.com/columns/bctimes/jeff_kart/index.ssf?/base/news-0/115160671297390.xml&coll=4

. . .

Dan Bishop, a Consumers spokesman, won't confirm the report. But he won't deny it either.

''Consumers Energy has made no announcement of additional capacity at Karn-Weadock,'' Bishop said in a recent interview.

The need for additional power was highlighted in a Capacity Need Forum report released earlier this year.

Growing demand means existing electric generation and transmission capacity won't be sufficient in the Lower Peninsula as early as 2009, according to the report, drafted by utility officials and others.

The report recommends that two new baseload coal-fired power plants be built, with the first becoming operational in 2011.

. . .

''It's clear that electric demand is increasing,'' he said when asked about plans for a Karn-Weadock expansion.

''Electric sales for Consumers were up approximately 2 percent last year. It was a warm year. People continue to use more air conditioners. Electric use is increasing. Michigan also has an aging electric generation fleet.''

The Karn-Weadock plant began operations in 1940. It now consists of three plants that burn coal, natural gas and fuel oil.

It's a good candidate for additional generation because it has both ship and rail access, some state regulators say.

. . .