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Re: E-M:/ RE: / Honey Bee Colony Collapse Disorder



I recently read that most of the wild bee population has disappeared because of our agricultural practices, loss of habitat, etc. Does anyone know if there has been an attempt to investigate whether CCD is effecting the remaining wild bee population?

I imagine wild bee conservation has not been a top priority, given all the other environmental issues, but has there been any attempt to conserve and/or re-establish wild bee populations?

Finally, while pesticides are used in urban areas, I imagine they aren't as intense or wide spread as those used in agriculture (I hope). Is there any way that wild bee colonies could be established in urban areas - perhaps as a reservoir? For instance, I could easily host a hive in my back yard without bothering anyone.

Best Regards,

Christopher Reader

On 4/24/07, Diana Jancek <dijaan@charter.net> wrote:
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Enviro-Mich message from Diana Jancek < dijaan@charter.net>
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There is an interesting pdf at Mid-Atlantic Apiculture Research &
Extension Consortium (MAAREC)
http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/index.html
Scroll to New! Testimony of Diana Cox-Foster to House of Reps Committee
on Ag, Sub-Committee on Horticulture & Organic Ag
A bit of the testimony:
"In CCD, the bee colony proceeds rapidly from a strong colony with many
individuals to a colony with few or no surviving bees. Queens are found
in collapsing colonies with a few young adult bees, lots of brood, and
more than adequate food resources. No dead adult bees are found in the
colony or outside in proximity to the colony. A unique aspect of CCD is
that there is a significant delay in robbing of the dead colony by bees
from other colonies or invasion by pest insects such as waxworm moths or
small hive beetles; this suggests the presence of a deterrent chemical
or toxin in the hive."


Susan Rasch wrote:
> I suspect it has more to do with an invasive species taking over a
> native specie's habitat.
>
> WovenWoman@aol.com wrote:
>>
>> Could wasps be eating the bees?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> See what's free at AOL.com
>> <http://www.aol.com?ncid=AOLAOF00020000000503 >.
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