[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

Re: E-M:/ Love mountains? Hate coal!



-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enviro-Mich message from Doug Welker <dwelker@up.net>
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

I agree, both are bad. Perhaps I am biased having spent so much time in the Appalachian coal fields.

Unfortunately, our coal reserves are much greater than our oil reserves, and when our oil reserves really start running out, coal will always be there as an energy source, and may be in even greater demand.

-doug-

At 10:58 PM 12/1/2007, Robert Isaac wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enviro-Mich message from "Robert Isaac" <rjisaac@gmail.com>
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

As opposed to a dropping water table, springs and creeks drying up,
and being forced to move off your ancestral land because you can no
longer find water for your animals and crops?

http://www.sacredland.org/endangered_sites_pages/black_mesa.html
http://www.stoppeabody.org/

They are both bad.

> I can think of several reasons why the issue is often more severe in
> the Appalachians:
>
> 1. Higher rainfall. This can result in
> a. More flash floods, landslides, etc.
> b. More acid drainage from waste rock and mines
> 2. Higher sulfur coal in the Appalachians, resulting in
> increased water acidity
> 3. Typically, steeper terrain in the Appalachians, resulting
> in more flash floods, landslides, etc.
> 4. There are fewer places for Appalachian folks to live. To
> live close to a mine, one must almost always live in a narrow
> valley. I worked for a number of years for the West Virginia
> Geological and Economic Survey (a state agency), and pored over every
> topo map that covers the state. In most of southwestern WV, where
> the majority of the mountaintop removal takes place in that state,
> the only reasonably flat areas (until mountaintop removal occurs!)
> are the narrow floodplains of streams. Exposing excavated rock and
> haul roads to heavy rainfall causes excessively high stream levels,
> and damage to homes, roads, etc. In addition, the streams are often
> so acidic that they contain no game fish, and if you try to swim in
> them your eyes sting horribly. Whole counties are like this. In the
> west, there are plenty of flat areas near the mines for housing, and
> there are plenty of clean streams around.
>
> See the attached topo map of Red Jacket WV for typical SW WV
> topography. The purple stipled pattern shows strip mines. Note the
> ringed pattern surrounding the hill whose summit is 2031 feet in the
> western part of the map. There is most likely valuable coal still
> left under that summit and above the uppermost strip mine. Removing
> the "country rock" (mostly sandstone and shale) above that strip mine
> would enable them to get to that coal more easily. Likewise, some of
> the lower coal seams (represented by lower strip mines) might be
> candidates as well.
>
> Much of eastern KY is very similar, as well as parts of western VA
> and even SE OH, though the hills in OH is lower. Farther north, most
> current coal mines are underground mines, which have their own
> problems (e.g., subsidence. This damages homes and roads, and even
> caused a popular state park lake to drain into the ground near the SW
> corner of PA. The coal company has made no effort to deal with the issue.).
>
> ` -doug-
>
>
> At 12:18 AM 12/1/2007, Robert Isaac wrote:
> >-------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >Enviro-Mich message from "Robert Isaac" <rjisaac@gmail.com>
> >-------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> >
> > > Is
> > > one method less destructive to the environment than another?
> >
> >I would classify the western strip/pit mines to be just as bad as
> >blowing a hill up in the south.
> >
> >==============================================================
> >ENVIRO-MICH: Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
> >and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action. Archives at
> >http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/
> >
> >Postings to: enviro-mich@great-lakes.net For info, send email to
> >majordomo@great-lakes.net with a one-line message body of "info enviro-mich"
> >==============================================================
>
> Doug Welker
> 26344 Tauriainen Road
> Pelkie MI 49958
> dwelker@up.net
> (906) 338-2680
>
> Never underestimate the power of human greed.
>
>


==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action.   Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================

Doug Welker 26344 Tauriainen Road Pelkie MI 49958 dwelker@up.net (906) 338-2680

Never underestimate the power of human greed.


============================================================== ENVIRO-MICH: Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action. Archives at http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================