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Re: E-M:/ Bald Cypress



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Enviro-Mich message from Doug Welker <dwelker@up.net>
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Baldcypress grows natively as far north as the Mississippi River valley in southern Illinois. It can typically handle temperatures as low as -15 degrees F, though some members of the species will likely handle colder temperatures. I grew them quite successfully in southwestern PA, on a moist flat about 200 feet above a valley bottom. They might have frozen out in the valley bottom, though, a frost pocket where I measured temperatures down to -28 degrees F in the late 70s. Planted baldcypress in Michigan came through the cold winters of the late 70s without any problems, according to one article I read. My attempt to grow them in the U.P. was an absolute failure, though. It is quite possible that they would do fine in the Saginaw Valley. There are scattered baldcypress planted as ornamental trees at least as for north as Mt. Pleasant.

The only species that one might find in the Saginaw Valley that could conceivably confused with baldcypress is tamarack, I expect. Both are conifers, both lose their needles in winter, and both like moist environments (though they don't require wet soils).

By the way, here is one news story I found:
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071123/METRO/711230361
The author of that story, by the way, worked in the southeastern U.S. before taking a job with the detnews. Maybe not an issue, but ...
I would suggest contacting Mr. Donnelly or the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge.


-doug-

At 04:22 PM 12/3/2007, michdave@aol.com wrote:
That's the first I've heard of it. Bald Cypress are native to the SouthEast United States. What news story refrenced them?
Michelle Hurd Riddick
Lone Tree Council


Several news stories describing the dioxin problem in the Saginaw River have referred to stands of bald cypress sharing the contaminated shore. I was not aware that bald cypress occurred naturally in Michigan.
Are these introduced trees or are the stories in error?





-----Original Message----- From: Fineart3@aol.com To: enviro-mich@great-lakes.net Sent: Mon, 3 Dec 2007 4:01 pm Subject: E-M:/ Bald Cypress

Several news stories describing the dioxin problem in the Saginaw River have referred to stands of bald cypress sharing the contaminated shore. I was not aware that bald cypress occurred naturally in Michigan.
Are these introduced trees or are the stories in error?



John Covert Friends of the Detroit River




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Doug Welker 26344 Tauriainen Road Pelkie MI 49958 dwelker@up.net (906) 338-2680

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