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E-M:/ Re:~ FW: / water use - thermal impacts - fish kills



In a message dated 6/3/2008 2:28:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Anne.Woiwode@sierraclub.org writes:
Yes, 70% of the water use is for cooling. The intake water use causes massive fish kills known as impingement -- fish that get stuck on the screens and entrainment -- fish (usually larval) that go through the screens.  Here in the western basin of Lake Erie - the warmest and shallowest are of the Great Lakes - 3 billion gallons of water are used on average each day. 
It would seem the same is happening to Saginaw Bay which is also very shallow. Also, proposed new coal plants at Essexville and Midland would draw additional billions of gallons of water from Saginaw Bay. Much of it would be deposited into the Tittabawassee and Saginaw rivers possibly increasing backyard (basement and frontyard?) flooding, dioxin release and fish kill.
 
If the proposed Dynegy (Midland) coal plant is built, heated water flowing into the Tittabawassee and Saginaw rivers may kill more fish and the poor who fish along the banks would have less exposure to dioxin. All the fish in these rivers are polluted with dioxin and there are severe restrictions on consumption.
 
Can't eat the fish there? No problem, the poor could just hunt more game. Oh wait!  The DEQ says about this area "eating deer, turkey, squirrel, wood duck or Canada goose that contain dioxin at the levels found in the Dow wild game studies could result in adverse health effects." (see below)
 
Can't eat the game there? Fortunately, many of these people can just make a trip to the food bank. Oh wait! With the new middle class surge at food banks, supplies are being quickly depleted and ........   
 
Take care and please turn off the A/C and unneeded lights,  frank
 
 
The Michigan Departments of Community Health, Environmental Quality and Natural Resources said samples of wild game taken from the floodplains in 2007 confirm high levels of dioxin and dioxin like compounds in muscle meats, skin and other consumable portions of animals. High levels of dioxins previously found in game taken along the Tittabawassee River had prompted a 2004 Health Advisory for whitetail deer, turkey, and squirrel.
 
State of Michigan health assessors have reviewed the 2007 wild game data for the floodplains of the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers downstream of Midland. The results conclude that eating deer, turkey, squirrel, wood duck or Canada goose that contain dioxin at the levels found in the Dow wild game studies could result in adverse health effects. Eating cottontail rabbit is not likely to result in adverse health effects
 
 
 




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