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Re: E-M:/ ZERO ENERGY HOMES



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Enviro-Mich message from "Chuck Cubbage" <charles.cubbage@comcast.net>
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Lowell,
Sams Club now has LEDs for prices that are competitive with CFLs! Selection is not wide but it appears it will not take as long as we may think to move to LEDs The brightness seems equivalent from the displays. Color is of course still different.
Regards,
Chuck
----- Original Message ----- From: "Lowell Prag" <lprag@mail.msen.com>
To: <enviro-mich@great-lakes.net>
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:44 AM
Subject: E-M:/ ZERO ENERGY HOMES



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Enviro-Mich message from "Lowell Prag" <lprag@mail.msen.com>
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On Mon, January 12, 2009 9:12 am, Norbert Izworski wrote:

... see below ...

Hello Norbert,

In actuality, light emitting diodes (leds) are far superior to compact
fluorescents (cfs) in regards to energy efficiency but it will take a few
years for the led prices to be competitive with cfs.

As far as increasing our overall energy efficiency in buildings, a little
known fact is that the federal government is leading the way in retro
fitting its old buildings and implementing much higher building codes for
its new construction.

What remains to do now, is for the federal government to implement much
higher building codes in the public sector.

In Michigan for example:

It was the construction industry itself which blocked higher building code
legislation in Lansing, out of fear that the slightly increased cost to
the buyer would hurt their business, ignoring the proven payback of higher
building codes in offsetting the initial cost.

Thankfully, the courts recently ruled against them and Michigan will get
higher building codes.

But:

The new codes are still woefully lower than what can actually be achieved
in energy efficiency.

As proof:

One has only to look at the new "zero energy homes" which over the course
of a year, actually produce more energy than they use and the utility
companies are forced to buy that surplus energy from you.

A good introduction to zero energy homes:
http://www.toolbase.org/ToolbaseResources/level3.aspx?BucketID=2&CategoryID=58

Examples of zero energy homes:
http://search.nrel.gov/query.html?qp=&style=eere&qs=&qc=eren&ws=0&qm=0&st=1&nh=10&lk=1&rf=0&oq=&col=eren&qt=zero+energy+homes&x=0&y=0

Actual zero energy home design:
http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/designing_remodeling/index.cfm/mytopic=10360

Regards,

Lowell Prag

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On Mon, January 12, 2009 9:12 am, Norbert Izworski wrote:

I am an environmental writer who writes for an out of state paper.
This article I researched would be an excellent way to help the
environment NOW.  The Federal government has legislated the phase in
of higher efficiency bulbs starting in 2010.  However, it is not until
2020 that they dictate bulb efficiencies must equal the amount that
the current CFL's are achieving.  Why wait.  We should force the issue
now.

Norbert Izworski

How to Shut Down the Fifty Dirtiest Coal Power Plants in the US
By Norbert Izworski

         It is as simple as changing a light bulb.  Lighting accounts
for about twenty percent of the average household's energy bill, so
changing all of our incandescent light bulbs to compact florescent
lights (CFLs) would have a major impact.
         Energy Star CFLs use up to eighty percent less energy than
conventional light bulbs.  "If all of our lighting was switched to
high efficiency bulbs we would save enough energy to shut down up to
90 average-size power plants."  (www.eartheasy.com)
         A study conducted in 2005 by the Commission for
Environmental Cooperation found that a small percentage of the
nation's 15,000 power plants release most of the emissions into the
atmosphere.  These emissions contribute significantly to acid rain,
haze, smog and climate change, as well as toxic mercury found in fish,
and then eaten by people.
         Another study called, "Dirty Kilowatts" conducted in 2007 by
the Environmental Integrity Project, states that just 50 old, dirty
and inefficient coal power plants, out of the nation's 1,700 coal
power plants, account for forty percent of the sulfur dioxide
emissions, twenty-five percent of the nitrous Oxide emissions, and one
third of the mercury pollution, but produce only about fourteen
percent of the nation's electricity.
         Coal power plants produce forty-three percent of the
nation's electricity, and are one of the biggest contributors of
global warming pollution.  About two thirds of the heat energy that is
generated at a typical coal-fired power plant is wasted, and that
inefficiency contributes directly to high carbon dioxide emissions at
these facilities.
         Eliminating carbon dioxide emissions from existing power
plants is not possible at this time, but emissions could be greatly
reduced by lowering demand through energy efficiency and
conservation.  Since the average home uses less than thirty light
bulbs, for $100.00 the entire home could be converted to high
efficiency CFLs.  It will save you money on your electric bills, and
reduce demand for electricity.
         When purchasing CFLs look for the Energy Star label to
guarantee high efficiency and long life.  CFLs can be matched to
equivalent incandescent bulb brightness.  For example, a sixty-watt
equivalent uses only thirteen watts of electricity.  CFLs are
available in both warm-white and cool-white.  They also come in
different shapes to fit a range of fixtures including globe lamps,
floodlights and candelabras.  Special CFLs are now available for use
with dimmer switches, timers, outdoor cold weather applications, and
recessed spot lights.
         Since CFLs contain minute amounts of mercury, they should
not be disposed of in household trash.  Please take spent CFLs to any
Home Depot store, selected Ikea stores, or you local household
hazardous waste site.
         For more information on CFLs, go to www.EnergyStar.gov/cfl.




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==============================================================
ENVIRO-MICH:  Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental
and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action.   Archives at
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Postings to:  enviro-mich@great-lakes.net      For info, send email to
majordomo@great-lakes.net  with a one-line message body of  "info enviro-mich"
==============================================================
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
All views and opinions presented above are solely those of the author or
attributed source and do not necessarily reflect those of GLIN or the Great Lakes Commission.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *