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Northeast-Midwest Weekly Update -- 19 May 1997



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                   Northeast-Midwest Institute

                          WEEKLY UPDATE

                           19 May 1997
                  -----------------------------

                         TOP OF THE NEWS


ASSESSING THE MIDWEST ECONOMY
-----------------------------
     The Northeast-Midwest Senate and Congressional Coalitions on
Wednesday, May 21, will host the presentation of a Chicago Fed study
on how the Midwest should act to maintain economic momentum.  The
study results from a year-long effort by economists from the Federal
Reserve Bank of Chicago to identify what brought about the dramatic
comeback of the midwestern economy from the early 1980s and what steps
business and government leaders can take to sustain the momentum in
the future.

     Actions taken by businesses and governments since the early 1980s
have better positioned the Midwest to withstand downturns in the
economy, according to the report.  Prospects are good for continued
strong growth in the region's economy but only if decision-makers act
now to address key policy issues.

     The event will be hosted by Rep. Jim Leach (R-IA), chairman of
the House Banking and Financial Services Committee, and Senator Carol
Moseley-Braun (D-IL).  Speakers will be Michael Moskow, president of
the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and William Testa, the
institution's chief economist.

     The breakfast briefing will begin at 8:30 am on Wednesday, May
21, in room SC-4 of the United States Capitol.

     CONTACT:  Dick Munson at the Northeast-Midwest Institute (544-
5200).


ECONOMIC VALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS
--------------------------------------------
     The Northeast-Midwest Institute's Panel on Economic Valuation of
Great Lakes Environmental Benefits will meet on Tuesday, May 20, in
Ann Arbor, Michigan, to discuss case studies of environmental
restoration and cleanup efforts.

     The case studies will highlight the use of economic techniques
used for valuing the benefits of environmental protection.  The topics
of the case studies include sediment remediation, air quality
improvements, soil erosion control, wetland conservation, maintenance
of fish populations, and the protection of human health.

     The panel includes economists from all eight Great Lakes states,
as well as Canada, representing academic, non-profit, and government
organizations.  Economists outside the Great Lakes region will also
participate in order to provide insight from existing valuation
practices that could be applicable to the Great Lakes.

     CONTACTS:  Patricia Cicero and Allegra Cangelosi at the
Northeast-Midwest Institute (544-5200).


POLLUTION PREVENTION IN THE GREAT LAKES
---------------------------------------
     The Northeast-Midwest Institute on Wednesday, May 20, will
cosponsor a conference in Chicago on pollution prevention strategies
to address mercury and other pollutants affecting the Great Lakes. 
The seminar will present a menu of pollution prevention ideas and
programs that have helped cities meet the requirements of the Great
Lakes Initiative (GLI).

     The conference presentations will show attendees where to get
help in establishing and/or improving their pollution prevention
strategies.  The seminar is not a regulatory conference stressing what
the GLI requires.

     The event is co-sponsored by the Association of Metropolitan
Sewerage Agencies, Water Environment Federation, and National League
of Cities; and is being organized in cooperation with the Great Lakes
states and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

     CONTACT:  Patricia Cicero at the Northeast-Midwest Institute
(544-5200).



               ESTIMATED FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION SPENDING BASED ON
            ISTEA, NEXTEA, STEP 21, STARS 2000, and S 586 Proposals*

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Trust Fund
           Payments
          Fiscal 95       ISTEA      NEXTEA     STEP 21  STARS 2000      S. 586
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

U.S.     18,804,978  18,046,177  19,871,982  25,255,518  25,763,893  24,058,178

New Eng.    801,454   1,576,508   1,352,849   1,172,580   1,202,832   1,756,555
  CT        190,302     353,399     375,196     244,836     256,105     528,272
  ME        101,164     117,841     102,511     127,228     137,947     150,203
  MA        335,057     830,961     579,970     429,660     432,082     655,647
  NH         71,914      88,538      94,667     122,046     123,846     137,646
  RI         49,967     106,168     106,339     139,155     141,907     151,437
  VT         53,050      79,601      94,166     109,655     110,945     133,350

Mid-Atl.  2,519,266   2,798,263   3,067,297   3,233,842   3,060,272   3,790,680
  DE         54,182      72,873      89,721     102,690     103,205     134,615
  MD        312,543     312,093     323,907     402,786     398,340     418,684
  NJ        518,814     521,721     578,407     658,170     616,715     703,140
  NY        823,229   1,002,986   1,159,287   1,046,543     978,573   1,461,057
  PA        810,498     888,590     915,975   1,023,653     963,439   1,073,184

Midwest   3,393,456   3,104,733   3,487,346   4,540,274   4,694,871   4,103,305
  IL        645,632     683,827     758,404     910,039     994,950     926,714
  IN        529,162     408,891     487,731     675,458     629,015     496,729
  IA        218,458     208,895     237,061     304,655     363,347     296,647
  MI        631,421     515,698     608,482     822,945     796,774     746,631
  MN        274,212     279,090     290,843     395,988     502,101     365,312
  OH        706,560     656,385     729,629     928,238     922,430     871,639
  WI        388,011     351,947     375,196     502,951     486,254     399,633

South     7,190,152   5,742,327   6,456,674   9,189,436   8,963,209   7,268,979
  AL        417,951     328,363     367,341     537,540     505,436     391,328
  AK        274,419     252,701     242,897     347,080     329,085     256,016
  FL        939,684     763,285     818,071   1,199,004   1,117,003   1,109,713
  GA        719,517     537,383     631,875     919,259     855,290     603,412
  KY        368,675     270,862     325,118     472,831     438,244     333,893
  LA        321,433     264,375     317,931     409,816     434,685     363,570
  MS        247,260     201,738     226,828     316,213     338,037     276,188
  NC        585,246     471,635     513,160     747,247     695,682     559,974
  OK        319,889     260,176     293,552     416,967     454,833     355,252
  SC        352,605     232,381     310,519     450,967     419,142     313,672
  TN        456,802     365,419     401,420     584,659     564,992     454,116
  TX      1,514,191   1,168,870   1,347,159   1,934,002   1,901,546   1,463,929
  VA        523,175     415,089     484,240     666,098     686,122     565,025
  WV        149,305     210,050     176,563     187,753     223,112     222,891

West      4,900,650   4,824,346   5,507,816   7,119,386   7,842,709   7,138,659
  AK         37,208     212,564     234,748     318,338     322,516     316,461
  AZ        330,717     255,527     291,405     423,860     453,765     342,670
  CA      1,925,890   1,665,383   1,917,192   2,459,118   2,300,006   2,478,496
  CO        238,701     201,166     264,052     319,602     414,497     315,258
  HI         49,085     126,673     138,441     140,977     141,907     190,396
  ID        102,313     125,172     126,403     177,116     224,473     183,484
  KS        210,203     210,317     245,906     294,963     391,043     332,368
  MO        490,091     399,652     472,261     624,663     639,167     545,857
  MT         92,953     161,873     174,557     243,225     287,756     224,402
  NE        150,195     139,446     157,883     211,522     255,201     214,141
  NV        126,851     115,076     121,944     169,982     234,810     179,935
  NM        181,743     178,644     194,621     269,163     318,340     245,094
  ND         69,446     116,407     114,365     159,365     203,392     182,885
  OR        247,416     213,094     250,912     319,082     369,877     317,680
  SD         70,860     116,338     128,409     179,707     232,201     190,892
  UT        146,818     130,229     174,868     191,254     313,297     232,515
  WA        342,234     341,531     375,452     448,747     507,820     461,532
  WY         87,926     115,254     124,397     168,702     232,641     184,593

-------------------------

	*Payments into the Fund include only the net tax receipts deposited in
the Highway Account of the Federal Highway Trust Fund.  Excluded are motor fuel
taxes transferred to the Mass Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund (1 cent
per gallon from April 1, 1983 through November 30, 1990, 1.5 cents per gallon
thereafter); the 0.1 cent per gallon dedicated to the Leaking Underground
Storage Tank Trust Fund beginning January 1, 1987; and the tax designated
reduction for deficit spending (2.5 cents per gallon from December 1, 1990
through September 30, 1993, 6.8 cents thereafter); and the tax from motorboat
use of gasoline transferred to the Aquatic Resources Trust Fund and the Land
and Water Conservation Fund.  Apportionments include fiscal year 1996
Interstate construction funds apportioned during fiscal year 1995.

SOURCE:  Northeast-Midwest staff calculations based on U.S. Department of
         Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, FE-221, "Comparison
         of Federal Highway Trust Fund Receipts Attributable to the States and
         Federal-Aid Apportionment and Allocations from the Fund, Fiscal Years
         1957-1995" and Congressional Quarterly, Volume 55, Number 19, May 10,
         1997, p. 1067.

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                       http://www.nemw.org
                     mailto:gstarnes@nemw.org
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