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EPA determination on Section 112 adequacy to control toxics into Great Lakes



I'm posting this for information.....  however, I don't particularly
agree with EPA's view, particularly with all of the "dumbing down" of 
EPA maximum achievable control technology standard setting that 
has gone on.....


From: GROUP PRESS 202-260-4355 <PRESS@epamail.epa.gov>
To: Multiple recipients of list <epa-press@valley.rtpnc.epa.gov>
Subject: PA EPA CITES PROGRESS IN CONTROLLING AIR TOXICS
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!PA/EPA CITES PROGRESS IN CONTROLLING AIR TOXICS/SCROLL 
FOR RELEASE:   FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1998


EPA CITES PROGRESS IN CONTROLLING AIR TOXICS AFFECTING 
LARGE U.S. WATER BODIES

                                   
After carefully considering extensive public comment, EPA today 
announced its decision that Section 112 of the existing Clean Air Act 
(CAA) provides the Agency sufficient legal authority to protect public 
health and the environment from air toxics falling into the Great 
Lakes, Lake Champlain, Chesapeake Bay and many U.S. coastal waters.  
The Agency believes any further legislative action is unnecessary at 
this time.  While significant progress has already been made in 
reducing air toxics affecting these water bodies, EPA will continue 
developing regulations and other environmental programs to achieve 
even further emission reductions.  The Agency is developing air toxic 
emission standards utilizing maximum achievable pollution control 
technology for over 170 different types of industry; many of these 
regulations have already been issued, and all should be completed by 
the end of the year 2000.  Examples include rules that will cut a wide 
variety of toxic emissions by 90 percent from the chemical industry; 
slash mercury emissions 90 percent and dioxin levels 99 percent from 
municipal waste combustors; and significantly reduce mercury (95 
percent) and dioxin (94 percent) from medical waste incinerators.  
Nitrogen compounds such as nitrogen oxide (NOx) are also deposited 
into water but are not classified as toxics.  Overly abundant nitrogen 
can cause excessive growth of algae, which can harm fish and shellfish 
and reduce light available to aquatic vegetation and coral reefs.  
EPA's acid rain program, is making considerable progress in achieving 
its goal of reducing NOx emissions two million tons from 1980 levels 
by the year 2000, and the Agency's new ozone and particulate standards 
will also reduce nitrogen deposition to water bodies.  Additionally, 
EPA's proposed ozone transport rule, which would significantly reduce 
NOx emissions from 22 states and Washington, D.C., will also lead to 
meaningful reductions in nitrogen deposition to the Chesapeake Bay and 
other eastern coastal waters.  EPA's decision is based on current 
information, but can be revisited if new information indicates a need 
to do so.  Today's  decision was proposed in June 1997, concurrent 
with the release of the EPA report entitled:  "Deposition of Air 
Pollutants to the Great Waters, Second Report to Congress (EPA-453/R-
97-011, June 1997).  Congress required both the report and a 
determination from EPA as to whether the air toxic provisions of the 
Clean Air Act (Section 112) provided EPA enough authority to prevent 
adverse public health and environmental effects associated with the 
atmospheric deposition of toxic air pollutants.  Today's determination 
will appear soon in the Federal Register, but is accessible on the 
Internet at:  http://www.epa.gov/ttn/oarpg.  For further technical 
information on the decision, contact Dale Evarts of EPA's Office of 
Air Quality Planning and Standards at 919-541-5535, or e-mail at:  
evarts.dale@epamail.epa.gov.

R-29           	                   ###


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