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UWM Field Station Workshops



PLEASE FORWARD THIS TO ANY INDIVIDUAL OR LIST THAT MAY BE INTERESTED!
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1998 NATURAL HISTORY WORKSHOPS at the UNIVERSITY OF
WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE FIELD STATION

METHODS FOR DESCRIPTION OF VEGETATION
18 - 22 May

SMALL MAMMAL TRAPPING AND HANDLING TECHNIQUES
5 & 6 June

FISHES OF WISCONSIN:  IDENTIFICATION AND ECOLOGY
10 & 11 July

MOSSES:  IDENTIFICATION AND ECOLOGY
17 & 18 July

GRASSES:  IDENTIFICATION AND ECOLOGY
14 & 15 August

WETLAND DELINEATION
21 & 22 August
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A VERY HIGH QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION

Our workshops offer a unique opportunity to explore focused topics in
natural history under the guidance of noted authorities.  Hands-on field and
laboratory investigations teach ecology, evolution, use of taxonomic keys
and new techniques.  The workshops present college-level instruction and
are designed to accommodate participants with a broad range of experience. 
The only prerequisite for any of the workshops is a keen interest in the
topic.  Enrollment in each session is limited to 20, providing an informal
atmosphere and individualized instruction.

NOW AVAILABLE FOR COLLEGE CREDIT!

Students who would like to receive credit (Undergraduate or Graduate) for
instruction in any of our workshop topics can enroll in UWM, Biological
Sciences, 204-562, Topics in Field Biology.  The two day workshops carry
one credit; the five day workshop two credits.  There is an additional
tuition fee for the Topics in Field Biology course.  Contact the Field
Station for information on how to enroll for credit and for the specific
requirements for completion of individual "Topics" courses.

Two day workshops schedule:  Friday:  9 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Friday evening,
discussion, individual study in the lab, or social.  Saturday:  8 a.m. to 3
p.m.

A list of recommended manuals or texts, useful materials, and special
course instructions will be mailed upon registration or request.  Bringing
personal collections to identification courses is always welcomed.  

The workshop fee includes overnight accommodations.  (Bring your own
sleeping bag and towels.)  Tent space is also available.  Four excellent,
home-cooked meals (2 lunches, Friday dinner, Saturday breakfast) are
provided at cost and are optional.  All meals include plenty to satisfy
vegetarians.

METHODS FOR DESCRIPTION OF VEGETATION, 18 - 22 May 1998
Instructor:  Dr. Jim Reinartz, Senior Scientist, UWM Field Station, has
over 20 years of experience in designing and conducting studies to describe
vegetation in a wide variety of habitats and for a wide range of purposes.
Schedule:  Monday, 18 May - Thursday, 21 May, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
each day; Friday, 22 May, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
The Course:  Learn how to plan, conduct, and summarize a description of
vegetation.  Several standard techniques for describing herbaceous, shrub,
and tree vegetation layers will be taught and practiced.  The concepts and
techniques taught in this course will enable students to design and complete
a description of vegetation for almost any purpose.

Meals:  We will help to organize and coordinate communal meal
preparation by the course participants who wish to share meals.

SMALL MAMMAL TRAPPING & HANDLING TECHNIQUES, 
5 & 6 June 1998
The Instructors:  Richard Bautz, DNR Research and Nicola Anthony, UW-
Madison, collectively have over 15 years of experience in small mammal
research.  In conjunction with the Wisconsin Small Mammal Survey project,
they have taught this course at the Field Station since 1996.
The Course:  Participants will learn small mammal handling and live
trapping techniques, field equipment, and the collection of data relevant to
small mammal inventory and mark recapture studies.  Students will gain
practical, hands-on experience in small mammal survey methods.

FISHES OF WISCONSIN:  IDENTIFICATION & ECOLOGY, 
10 & 11 July 1998
Instructor:  Dr. Timothy Ehlinger, Associate Professor of Biology at
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee teaches Ichthyology and Fish Ecology at
UWM, and is active in research on fish behavior, evolution and
conservation biology.
The Course:  Focusing on the lifestyle, ecology, and behavior of Wisconsin's
fish fauna.  Participants will learn how to identify fishes and examine fish
habitats in southeastern Wisconsin.  The course will involve both laboratory
and field work.

MOSSES:  IDENTIFICATION & ECOLOGY, 17 & 18 July, 1998
Instructor:  Dr. Frank Bowers, Professor Emeritus at the University of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point, now lives in Arkansas after retiring from 22 years
of teaching and research at UWSP.  He has continued research interests in
the Bryophyte flora of Wisconsin and the central U.S.
The Course:  After introduction to the main groups and evolutionary
history of bryophytes, workshop topics will include field collecting, field
and
microscopic identification, use of keys, recognition of families, herbarium
techniques, and use of bryophytes in teaching.

GRASSES:  IDENTIFICATION & ECOLOGY, 14 & 15 August, 1998
Instructor:  Dr. Robert Freckmann, Professor of Biology at University of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point, has primary interests in the grass flora of
Wisconsin and in the evolution of the genus Panicum.
The Course:  We will survey the evolution and diversity of the grass family,
emphasizing grasses of the local area and reviewing grass structure and
terminology as it applies to identification.  Field and microscopic
identification, use of keys, characteristics of tribes, and ecology of grasses
will be covered.

WETLAND DELINEATION, 21 & 22 August, 1998
Instructor:  Donald M. Reed is Chief Biologist with the Southeastern
Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission and provides consultant services
concerning wetlands.  His work includes wetland delineation, wetland
function and quality assessments, and wetland mitigation and restoration
planning.  Among other studies and reports, he is the co-author of
"Wetland Plants and Plant Communities of Minnesota and Wisconsin".
The Course:  Designed to provide participants with an overview of
Wisconsin wetland plant communities and the methods used to determine
their boundaries.  The use of federal and state recommended vegetation,
soil, and hydrology criteria for boundary location and delineation will be
emphasized.

TAKING WORKSHOPS FOR CREDIT:
To obtain university credit for a workshop, you must enroll in UWM, 204-
562, Topics in Field Biology, and pay tuition for that course.  Tuition rates
vary depending on residency and student status (eg. 1 undergraduate credit
for a Wisconsin resident in an off-campus course costs $119; tuition for a
graduate credit is $268 for a Wisconsin resident).  If you are interested in
obtaining credit for a workshop, please contact the Field Station for tuition
rate and registration forms.

                                    FEES          MEALS(Optional)
                                (Do Not Include   2 lunches      Friday  
WORKSHOP                        Credit Tuition    breakfast      Dinner
_________________________________________________________________        
Description of Vegetation           150.00        *              *
Small Mammals                         60.00       12.00          7.00
Fishes                                60.00       12.00          7.00
Mosses                                60.00       12.00          7.00
Grasses                               60.00       12.00          7.00
Wetland Delineation                   90.00       12.00          7.00

*Meal program not offered with Vegetation Description Workshop.

For a Registration Form or More Information Contact:

       Dr. James A. Reinartz
       UWM-Field Station
       3095 Blue Goose Road
       Saukville, WI  53080
       Phone:  (414) 675-6844
       Fax:  (414) 675-0337
       email:  jimr@uwm.edu