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GLIN==> GLERL Seminar 8/12/99



Posted on behalf of Cathy Darnell <darnell@glerl.noaa.gov>

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GLERL Seminar Series
Karl Schneider, Institute for Geography, Munich, Germany
"Coupled Modelling of Water, Nitrogen, and Carbon Fluxes on the Landscape
Scale using Remote Sensing"

Thursday, August 12, 1999, 10-11 a.m., Main Conference Room (105), Great
Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 2205 Commonwealth Blvd., Ann
Arbor, MI

The presence and state of vegetation strongly determines the fluxes of
water, nitrogen and carbon at the land surface. Most hydrological models
use a prescribed vegetation parameterization and thereby ignore
interactions and feedbacks with the vegetation. Plant growth models on the
other hand usually use simple hydrological components and are mostly
limited to the field scale and specific plant species. Direct coupling of
water and carbon fluxes is usually not considered by these models. Moreover
feedback mechanisms between water, carbon and nitrogen fluxes are often
ignored.

In this talk, a coupled, process oriented evapotranspiration and plant
growth model is presented. The process-oriented model directly links plant
growth, hydrology and nitrogen fluxes. Through the integrated raster GIS
system, spatial patterns of meteorological parameters, plant parameters,
nitrogen and water fluxes are modelled on the landscape scale. The model
was applied to the Ammer watershed in Upper Bavaria/Germany, 709 km".
Model results were compared with ground truth and remote sensing
measurements.  As can be shown, time series of remote sensing data can be
used successfully to determine model parameters (such as the date of
cutting of meadows) which otherwise cannot be determine accurately on the
landscape scale.



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