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Re: GLIN==> quiz show great lakes answer -Reply



Correction:  I posted the message regarding the quiz
question for Frank Anscombe.  Please send your
responses to frank at:

anscombe.frank@epa.gov

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Mark:   Yes, philosophically and physically you're correct, but
perception and politics steer (taint??) reality.  Since society has
historically presented and treated them as TWO lakes (note that even
the GLWQA established a different target P load for each), they "are"
two lakes, and the answer is correct in the context it was asked.
Otherwise there would be four Great Lakes, not five!!   Seems that
colloquialism has a lot of power!!

Dave Reid

----- Original Message -----
From: MARK ELSTER <ELSTER.MARK@epamail.epa.gov>
To: <glin-announce@glc.org>
Cc: <ANSCOMBE.FRANK@epamail.epa.gov>
Sent: August 20, 1999 12:42
Subject: GLIN==> quiz show great lakes answer


Actually, the show still seems wrong.

Huron and Michigan are one waterbody, at the same
elevation from sea-level, with a narrowing at the Straits of
Mackinac.

The question should be: which is the second largest of the
Great Lakes by water volume?

The answer would be: the single waterbody which is
known colloquially by the two names, Lake Huron and
Lake Michigan.  Considered together, Huron-Michigan
still holds less water than Superior.

Alternatively, the question could be asked which of the
Great Lakes is largest by surface area?  The answer would
be Huron-Michigan.

If someone got this right in a gameshow, their winnings
would seem earned.

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