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GLIN==> new book



Jack Manno, the Executive Director New York's Great Lakes Research
Consortium and the President of Great Lakes United has written a new book.
See below for description and ordering information:

****

What are the obstacles in the way of effectively resolving the
environmental crises of our time? What can we do to overcome them?
Privileged Goods: Commoditization and Its Impacts on Environment and
Society, is a new book from Lewis Publishers and the International Society
for Ecological Economics. Written by scholar and activist, Jack Manno,
Privileged Goods suggests that our propensity toward environmental
destruction can be understood as resulting from poorly understood economic
forces. These forces act as selection pressures systematically biasing
systems of production and consumption toward ever-increasing mobilization
of energy and materials with all its related environmental stress.
Interdisciplinary in scope, Privileged Goods will appeal to a wide variety
of environmental activists and professionals.  It explains key concepts
associated with the notion of commoditization and links these with an
understanding of the causes of social oppression, discusses the history of
public economic policy, and analyzes the similarities between the
sustainable development movement of today and the appropriate technology
movement of the 1970s. 30-day examination is available to review a book for
class adoption. For more information visit http://www.crcpress.com.


Jack Manno
Great Lakes Research Consortium
24 Bray Hall
SUNY ESF
Syracuse, NY  13210
315-470-6816 (work)
315-422-9633 (home)
315-470-6970 (fax)
jpmanno@mailbox.syr.edu
http://www.esf.edu/glrc/


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