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GLIN==> Northeast-Midwest Weekly Update -- 15 November 1999



BROWNFIELD STATE-OF-THE-STATES REPORT
-------------------------------------
      The Northeast-Midwest Institute this week also will release an
updated review of state activities associated with brownfield cleanup
and redevelopment.  The report reveals how states are taking an
increasingly active role in promoting the identification, clean up,
and redevelopment of contaminated sites.

      A companion document, BROWNFIELD VOLUNTARY CLEANUP PROGRAM
IMPACTS, seeks to evaluate the impacts of various brownfield programs
by highlighting five economic impacts, including the number of sites
that entered the program and/or subsequently completed it; jobs
created; housing units developed; tax revenues added to the local
economy; and businesses created.

      The information is based on telephone interviews with
environmental and economic development staff in all 50 states,
conducted during July and August, as well as additional information
submitted by states since that time.

      CONTACTS:  Charles Bartsch and Bridget Dorfman at the Northeast-
Midwest Institute (544-5200).


REPORT ON FINANCING NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION CONTROL
-----------------------------------------------------
      The Northeast-Midwest Institute's Nonpoint Finance Project last
week released a report from its Chicago forum on innovative means to
finance nonpoint source pollution control.  The report, which is
located on the Institute's web site, reveals that environmental,
finance, and farm interests can find common ground on financing
issues.  Participants at the forum felt the 2000 Farm Bill will be an
appropriate vehicle for implementing financing reforms.  The project,
done in conjunction with the Marine Studies Consortium, will hold its
next forum on January 10 in Baltimore.

      CONTACT:  George Dusenbury at the Northeast-Midwest Institute
(544-5200).


LETTER ON NON-NATIVE SPECIES
----------------------------
      Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY) this week is circulating
for signatures a letter to the White House expressing concern over the
growing economic and ecological threat presented by non-native
species.  The letter references a recent study by the American
Association for the Advancement of Science estimating that non-native
species cause $123 billion in damage annually.  This figure is more
than twice the annual economic damage caused by all natural disasters
in the United States.

      Senator Moynihan, co-chair of the Northeast-Midwest Senate
Coalition, urges the White House to increase funding for invasive
species programs at the various federal agencies.  Destructive non-
native species include the Asian long-horned beetle, zebra mussel,
fire ant, kudzu, green crab, leafy spurge, and brown tree snake.  A
similar letter is being circulated in the House by Rep. Carolyn
Maloney (D-NY).

      CONTACTS:  Matt Little and Kate Bicknell with Senator Moynihan
(224-4451) and Mike Fisher with Rep. Maloney (225-7944).


Western and Southern Subsidy Passes House
-----------------------------------------
      The House last week approved the County Schools Funding
Revitalization Act of 1999, which provides a substantial subsidy to
western and southern communities.  The bill (H.R. 2389), approved by a
274-153 vote, would offer $1.1 billion to counties containing U.S.
Forest Service (USFS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land.

      Many western and southern counties have been receiving smaller
payments from the federal government as timber harvests fell since the
1980s to more sustainable levels.  Officials from these areas of
reduced harvests have argued that the associated reduced revenue flow
is creating a serious threat to their local schools and economies.

      H.R. 2389 amounts to a $1.1 billion gift over fiscal years 2000-
2004 from general revenue to these counties, which are mostly in the
West and South.  In contrast to the claims by southern and western
members that their schools are in desperate need of more federal
funds, it is the Northeast and Midwest that are shortchanged on
education funding.  As of fiscal year 1995, the Northeast-Midwest
region received only 36 percent of the total federal grants given for
public elementary and secondary schools despite the fact that the
region contains 41 percent of the population.

      CONTACT:  Tim Daniels at the Northeast-Midwest Congressional
Coalition (225-5361).

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