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GLIN==> Final Reports Available: Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund



Posted on behalf of Debbie Katterheinrich <debbie.katter@web.epa.ohio.gov>

---
January 26, 2000

Final Reports Available for 1999 Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund Grant
Projects

The Ohio Lake Erie Commission announces the Final Reports for the
Commission's Lake Erie Protection Fund grant projects completed in 1999 are
available upon request.  The 11 projects completed in 1999 are listed
below, followed by abstracts of each.  These final reports are available
for viewing at Ohio EPA's Resource Center, and hard copies are available at
the Ohio Lake Erie Commission's Office Library.  To receive a copy of a
specific report(s), contact the Commission at oleo@www.epa.state.oh.us or
419/245-2514.

The Lake Erie Protection Fund was established in 1992 to help finance
research, restoration and implementation projects that help protect and
preserve Lake Erie.  During the last eight years, the Commission has
awarded nearly $5 million in Lake Erie Protection Fund monies for extensive
research and implementation projects that focus on improving the quality of
Lake Erie.  This revenue is generated from monies received through the Lake
Erie License Plate Program and through Ohio's participation in the Great
Lakes Protection Fund.

The Ohio Lake Erie Commission is comprised of the directors of the Ohio
Environmental
Protection Agency, and the Departments of Natural Resources,
Transportation, Development, Health and Agriculture.  The Commission was
established for the purpose of preserving Lake Erie's natural resources,
protecting the quality of waters and ecosystem and promoting economic
development of the region.

For more information on the Ohio Lake Erie Commission's programs, visit our
web site at www.epa.state.oh.us/oleo/



Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund 1999 Grant Projects Final Reports
1. Long-term Nonpoint Pollution Abatement by a Lake Erie Marsh and its
Implications for Wetland Restoration Policies, J.F. Gottgens, A.L.
Spongberg, and B.E. Muller

2. Congener-Specific Analysis and toxic Potential of Polychlorinated
Biphenyls in Snapping Turtle Eggs from Ohio Lake Erie Basin, H. Dabrowska
and S. W. Fisher

3. Common Groundwork-A Practical Guide to Protecting Rural and Urban Land,
J.H. Chadbourne and M.S. Chadbourne

4. Valuing The Ottawa River: The Economic Values and Impacts of
Recreational Boating, L. Hushak and M. Bielen

5. Avian Habitat Preferences and Implications for Management of the Maumee
Bay State Park Wetland, 1999, D. K. Bollin

6. Archaeological Investigation of Scow Schooner W. R. Hanna at Kelleys
Island, Lake Erie, C.P. Labadie and C.E. Herdendorf

7. Does Trace Metal Availability Constrain Phytoplankton Growth and
Standing Crop in Lake Erie? R.M. McKay

8. Spatial Modeling and Analysis for Shoreline Change Detection and Coastal
Erosion Monitoring, R. Li, J.K. Liu and Y. Felus

9. Genetic Analysis of Freshwater Mussel Populations Across the Lake
Erie/Ohio River Drainage Divide, D.J. Berg

10. Stream Habitat and Land Use Assessment for North Central Tributaries to
Lake Erie,
L. Cornell, S. Reed and D. Baker

11. Wetcleaning Demonstration and Deployment Project at Reehorst Cleaners,
North
Olmstead, OH., CAMP, Inc.


ABSTRACTS
1. Long-Term Nonpoint Pollution Abatement by a Lake Erie Marsh and its
Implications for Wetland Restoration Policies, J.G. Gottgens, A.L.
Spongberg, and B.E. Muller, Departments of Biology and Geology, University
of Toledo.  Assisted by D.H. Davis, Department of Political Science and
Public Administration, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH.  December 1999
Because of increasing anthropogenic pressure on freshwater resources,
research on the ability of wetlands to mitigate pollution from nonpoint
sources continues to receive high priority by scientific and regulatory
communities.  Wetlands may act in the short-term as a sink for nutrients
and pesticides. However, long-term studies on the potential of wetlands to
trap nutrients and pesticides from runoff are lacking.  This grant project
addressed the long-term issue by studying two marshes along the
southwestern shore of Lake Erie:  North Marsh and West Marsh.

2. Congener-Specific Analysis and Toxic Potential of Polychlorinated
Biphenyls in Snapping Turtle Eggs from Ohio Lake Erie Basin, Henryka
Dabrowska, Susan W. Fisher, The Ohio State University, Department of
Entomology and John Estenik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency,
Columbus, OH.
Characteristics of the snapping turtle's life style and their ubiquitous
distribution throughout the United States and Canada make them a valuable
bioindicator of chemical exposure and the effects of environmental
contaminants.  The objective of this grant project was to provide
information about total and congener-specific levels of PCBs and to
determine the toxicological significance of non-ortho, mono-ortho and
di-ortho chlorinated congeners encountered in the turtle egg samples.

3. Common Groundwork: A Practical Guide to Protecting Rural and Urban Land,
A Handbook for Making Land-Use Decisions, A Joint Project of the Western
Reserve RC&D, Ohio Office of Farmland Preservation, Seventh Generation, and
Chadbourne & Chadbourne, Inc.
There is no greater land-use challenge for modern communities than
sprawl-the mitigation from urban centers to suburbs and rural areas that
leaves behind inner cities while damaging farmlands and open spaces.  This
handbook explores how farmland and open-space preservation can safeguard
the economic viability of major cities, agricultural industries and future
food sources, as well as our natural and cultural assets.  It further
outlines how to make land-use choices that are environmentally, socially,
and economically viable over the long-term-creating livable and sustainable
communities for the future.

4. Valuing the Ottawa River: The Economic Values and Impacts of
Recreational
Boating, Prepared for the Ottawa River Action Group of the Maumee RAP
(Remedial
Action Plan) by Leroy Hushak, Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State
University,
Columbus, OH. and Mary Bielen, Agent, Ohio Sea Grant Extension, Toledo, OH.
The purposes of this grant project is to provide the basis to build the
necessary local
financial support to make dredging of the Ottawa River possible.  This
study provides
input for justification and financial support for both navigational
dredging and
contaminated sediment dredging.  Previous Army Corps of Engineers studies
in 1976
and 1991 found sufficient benefit-to-cost ratios existed to justify
navigational
dredging of the Ottawa River and channel to Lake Erie, but each project
lacked a
local sponsor to cost share it causing the Corp's deferment to dredge.

5. Avian Habitat Preferences and Implications for Management of the Maumee
Bay State Park Wetland, 1999, Dana K. Bollin, Ohio Department of Natural
Resources-Maumee Bay State Park.
Of special concern in Ohio are avian species dependant upon various wetland
habitats, much of which has been destroyed and/or converted to agriculture,
marinas, condominiums, and urban/suburban sprawl.  This grant project was
undertaken to obtain a better understanding of the bird use in this little
known part of the Maumee Bay State Park and to assess that use in an
attempt to manage for its wetland potential.  The knowledge acquired from
this project will be used to develop new programs designed to inform the
public about the important of Ohio's remaining wetlands, and the species
who reside in them.

6. Archaeological Investigation of Scow Schooner W. R. Hanna at Kelleys
Island, Lake Erie, Ohio, October 1998 - June 1999, by C. Patrick Labadie,
Superior Historical research, Superior, WI. and Charles E. Herdendorf,
Dept. of Geological Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.
In October1998 the second in a series of shipwreck archaeology workshops
was sponsored by the Lake Erie Protection Fund.  The W.R. Hanna was the
second shipwreck mapped as a class exercise and its documentation is the
focus of this final grant report.  Analysis of the shipwreck indicated an
entire lower hull of a wooden scow schooner used on the Great Lakes from
the 1820s until the turn of the Century.  The vessel proved to be
"cross-planked", unlike most wooden ships, in which the details of their
construction have long puzzled scholars.  The documentation of this vessel
will be a highly significant contribution to the history of regional
watercraft.

7. Does Trace Metal Availability Constrain Phytoplankton Growth and
Standing Crop in Lake Erie?  R. Michael McKay, Department of Biological
Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH.
Limitation of primary production by phosphorus availability is a central
tenet of modern day Great               Lakes limnology.  In light of
seeming overwhelming evidence in support of P limitation, it is tempting to
overlook the often-important role played by other elements in regulating
lake productivity.  Specifically, the potential for trace metal, or
"micronutrient" limitation in the Great Lakes has received limited
attention.  This grant project reexamines trace metal phytoplankton
interactions.

8. Spatial Modeling And Analysis For Shoreline Change Detection And Coastal
Erosion Monitoring, Ron Li, Jung-Kuan Liu and Yaron Felus. Department of
Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science, The Ohio State
University, Columbus, OH.  Coastal erosion presents a serious problem
throughout U.S. coastal areas.  This grant project presents research
results of a project that monitors shoreline erosion using high-resolution
imagery and examines erosion cause parameters.  Spatial modeling and
analysis methods are applied for the south shore of Lake Erie.  The
shoreline is represented as a dynamically segmented linear model that is
attached with a large amount of data to describe shoreline changes.  A new
method computes an instantaneous shoreline using a digital water level, a
coastal DTM, and bathymetric data.

9. A Genetic Analysis of Freshwater Mussel Populations Across the Lake
Erie/Ohio River Drainage Divide, David J. Berg, Association Professor,
Department of Zoology, Miami University, Hamilton, OH.  Freshwater mussels
form the most diverse and endangered element of the North American benthic
fauna.  Many species have been extirpated from Lake Erie due to biofouling
by zebra mussels and other parts of Ohio have also seen drastic declines in
the numbers of mussels.  Reintroduction of unionids has been proposed to
restore extirpated populations.  This grant project compared genetic
variation among freshwater mussel populations from Lake Erie tributaries
and the Ohio River basin.
Completion of this project provides the first step in assessing how
reintroduction of unionids into Lake Erie and other parts of Ohio might
best be accomplished.

10. Stream Habitat and Land Use Assessment for North Central Tributaries to
Lake Erie,
      Dr. Linda Cornell, Project Director; Sharon Reed, Undergraduate
Assistant; and
      Dr. David Baker, Water Quality Laboratory Director; Water Quality
Laboratory, Heidelberg College,                    Tiffin, OH.  This
project evaluated stream habitats in the Huron River Basin and in the Honey
Creek watershed of the Sandusky Basin and determined land use in areas
contiguous to the riparian zones.  The ODNR modified QHEI: Stream Habitat
Screening Tool, approved by the OEPA for volunteer groups, was used to
evaluate the stream habitats and land use.  An additional stream and bank
inventory form, developed by the Water Quality Laboratory of Heidelberg
College (WQL), was used to evaluate the physical habitat along transects
within each selected reach.  The Huron Volunteer Stream Monitors (HCVSM)
assisted the Water Quality Lab in the evaluation of the Huron River.

11.  Wetcleaning Demonstration and Deployment Project at Reehorst Cleaners,
North Olmsted, OH.,       November 1, 1997 through October 31, 1998, A
Project of CAMP, Inc. May 1999 (Interim Report)
In 1995, CAMP created a two-phase, five-year plan, the Organochlorine
Project, to identify the types and sources of toxic chemicals used in and
released to the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem by the region's industries.
CAMP's goal was to reduce the economic burden imposed by environmental
regulations on those industries and to improve the ecosystem and human
health of the Basin's eight border states and Ontario.


Debbie Katterheinrich
Public Information Specialist
Ohio Lake Erie Commission
One Maritime Plaza, 4th Floor
Toledo, OH  43604-1866
419/245-2514
fax:  419/245-2519
debbie.katter@www.epa.state.oh.us
web site:  http://www.epa.state.oh.us/oleo








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