[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

GLIN==> COASTAL PROGRAM REACHES NEW SHORES




--------------- cc:Mail Forwarded ---------------
From:     NEWS@fws.gov AT FWS
Date:     03/08/2000 01:44 PM
To:       fws-news@www.fws.gov AT FWS
Subject:  COASTAL PROGRAM REACHES NEW SHORES




March 8, 2000                                       Mitch Snow
202-208-5634

                   COASTAL PROGRAM REACHES NEW SHORES

Shorelines in Alaska, the Great Lakes states, and Hawaii and
the Pacific
territories this year will join 11 other areas that receive
concentrated
attention from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Coastal Program.

"Coastal ecosystems make up about 10 percent of the nation's
land area, but
40 percent of our National Wildlife Refuges are in coastal
areas and 80
percent of non-game migratory birds and waterfowl depend on the
coasts for
nesting, foraging, and resting habitat" Service Director Jamie
Rappaport
Clark said.  "Human population density already is five times
greater along
America's coasts than it is in the country's interior.
Continued
population growth along the coasts makes it all the more
critical that we
take appropriate action to conserve these irreplaceable
ecosystems that
support such a diversity of wildlife, as well as homes, jobs,
and
recreational opportunities for people."

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Coastal Program is a
non-regulatory,
partnership-based program that restores and protects coastal
habitats,
removes and retrofits barriers to fish passage in coastal
watersheds and
estuaries, and controls exotic invasive species that threaten
coastal
ecosystems.  The program focuses on a variety of habitat types,
including
salt marshes, maritime forests, dunes, coastal prairies,
mudflats and
stream banks.  The program serves projects on both private and
public
lands.

The Coastal Program works closely with other Federal, State,
Tribal and
local government agencies, conservation organizations,
business, and
private landowners.  Program biologists provide these partners
with
technical and financial assistance to produce on-the-ground
results that
benefit fish and wildlife resources in coastal areas. Because
Service funds
are leveraged with partners' funds in these efforts, the
Coastal Program's
ability to conserve important habitats is more than tripled.

The three coastal areas to receive funding for the first time
under the
program in FY 2000 present unique habitat conservation
challenges:

o  Pacific Islands projects will use native vegetation for
reforestation
efforts aimed at reducing sedimentation and restoring
silt-covered coral
reefs, work with partners to develop conservation easements on
fragile
coastal habitats, and enhance nesting habitat for sea turtles.

o  Great Lakes projects will restore stream-side habitats
important to
native recreational fisheries, restore shoreline wetlands to
improve fish
spawning success, and work with partners to acquire habitat for
piping
plovers and bald eagles.

o  Alaska projects will restore stream-side habitat along the
Cook Inlet,
restore important anadromous fisheries habitat on the Kenai
River, and work
with partners to protect undeveloped coastal mud flats, tidal
marshes and
forests.

Expansion of the program will ensure that the technical and
financial
assistance it provides will now be available to partners in all
coastal
regions of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  The three new
locations
join ongoing Service efforts in the Gulf of Maine, Southern New
England/New
York Bight, Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle/Pamlico
Sound, South
Carolina Coast, Everglades/South Florida, Texas Coast, Southern
California/San Diego Bay, San Francisco Bay, and Puget Sound.

For more information about the Service's Coastal Program, write
to the
Division of Habitat Conservation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, 4401
North Fairfax Drive, Room 400, Arlington, Virginia 22203; or
visit the
program's Internet site at http://www.fws.gov/cep/coastweb.html.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal
agency
responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish,
wildlife and
plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the
American
people.  The Service manages the 93-million-acre National
Wildlife Refuge
System which encompasses more than 520 national wildlife
refuges, thousands
of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also
operates 66
national fish hatcheries, 64 fish and wildlife management
assistance
offices, 64 Fishery Resource Offices and 78 ecological services
field
stations.  The agency enforces Federal wildlife laws,
administers the
Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations,
restores
nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores
wildlife habitat
such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their
conservation
efforts.  It also oversees the Federal Aid program that
distributes
hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and
hunting
equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

                                  -FWS-



* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
glin-announce is hosted by the Great Lakes Information Network:
http://www.great-lakes.net
To search the glin-announce archives:
http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/glin-announce/index.html
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *