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GLIN==> Lower Great Lakes Erosion Study Web Site



Posted on behalf of Christian Stewart <cstewart@orcatec.com>

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In 1998 the Buffalo District office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
(USACE) initiated the Lower Great Lakes Erosion Study (LGLES). The goal of
this study is to develop tools for the assessment of local and regional
impacts associated with coastal projects.

A comprehensive web site is now available for this project and can be viewed
at:

http://www.orcatec.com/LGLES
(note address is case sensitive)

The tools being developed in the LGLES will be applied to assist a wide
range of USACE activities on the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, the
Niagara River and Lake Erie including regional sand management issues,
maintenance of federal navigation projects, federal coastal erosion and
flooding projects, permitting of activities in the coastal zone, technical
assistance and advice, public education activities, lake level regulation
responsibilities and state and local coastal zone management.

In an effort to communicate the various activities that have taken place in
the LGLES over the past three years and to seek input on future direction,
the LGLES Study Team will be holding a Study Workshop on September 20-21,
2000 in Niagara Falls, New York.

The workshop will be held at the Holiday Inn Select, 300 Third Street,
Niagara Falls, NY, and will begin at around 1:00pm on the 20th and end
around noon on the 21st.  Any interested individuals are invited to attend.

Further details on this workshop or on the LGLES study itself can be
obtained from Tony Eberhardt of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo
District.  Phone: 716-879-4257,   E-Mail: anthony.j.eberhardt@usace.army.mil



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