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GLIN==> Lake Erie Protection Fund Final Reports Available




Jamie Kochensparger
Public Information Specialist
Ohio Lake Erie Commission
One Maritime Plaza, 4th Floor
Toledo, OH  43604-1866
419/245-2514
fax:  419/245-2519


-----Original Message-----

October 11, 2000

Final Reports Available for Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund Grant Projects

The Ohio Lake Erie Commission announces Final Reports for the Commission's
Lake Erie Protection Fund grant projects completed in year 2000 are now
available upon request. The 17 projects are listed below. These final
reports will be available for viewing at the Library of the Ohio Lake Erie
Commission Office and Ohio EPA's Resource Center. To receive a copy of a
specific report, please contact the Commission at oleo@www.epa.state.oh.us
or call 419/245-2514.

The Lake Erie Protection Fund was established in 1992 to help finance
research, restoration and implementation projects that help protect and
preserve Lake Erie. During the last eight years, the Commission has awarded
over $5.2 million in Lake Erie Protection Fund monies for extensive research
and implementation projects that focus on improving the quality of Lake
Erie. This revenue is generated from monies received through the Lake Erie
License Plate Program and through Ohio's participation in the Great Lakes
Protection Fund.

The Ohio Lake Erie Commission is comprised of the directors of the Ohio
Environmental Protection Agency, and the Departments of Natural Resources,
Transportation, Development, Health and Agriculture. The Commission was
established for the purpose of preserving Lake Erie's natural resources,
protecting the quality of waters and ecosystem, and promoting economic
development of the region.

For more information on Ohio Lake Erie Commission programs, visit our web
site at www.epa.state.oh.us/oleo


-MORE-





Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund 2000 Grant Projects
Final Reports 2000

MICRO
1) Toxicity, Ecological Impact, Monitoring, Causes and Public Awareness of
Microcystis Blooms in Lake Erie, D. Culver.

LEPF 11-94
2) A Demonstration of a Constructed Wetland for Home Wastewater Treatment,
C. Custer.

LEPF 97-04
3) A Collaborative Demonstration and Deployment Project to Reduce Emissions
of the Suspected Human Carcinogen, Tetrachloroethylene, to Lake Erie and to
Ohio's Air, Water, and Soil, J. Chadbourne.

LEPF 97-20
4) Implementation of a House Bill 110 Project in Ashtabula County, R.J.
Saporito.

LEPF 97-29
5) Transport of Particulate Pollutants in Lake Erie Tributaries: The Role of
Particle Size and Size-Specific Chemistry, R.P. Richards.

LEPF 97-30
6) Ecosystem Change in Lake Erie: Recolonization by Burrowing Mayflies and
their Contribution to Fish Diets, K. Krieger.

LEPF 97-32
7) Yellow Creek Watershed Protection and Restoration Project, C. Custer.

SG 14-95
8) EROD Activity and P4501A Protein Content in Liver of Yellow Perch as
Biomarkers of PCBP Exposure, H. Dabrowska

SG 34-96
9) Induced Spermiation and Characterization of Spermatozoa of the Sea
Lamprey,
 K. Dabrowski

SG 74-98
10) Genetic Characterization of the Yellow Perch in Lake Erie, C.A. Stepien.

SG 78-98
11) West Creek Greenway, D.J. Vasarhelyi

SG 90-98
12) Economic Contribution of Recreational Boating in Ohio, L. Hushak.

SG 92-98
13) Field Demonstration for Mechanical Control of Zebra Mussels, T.J. Chang

SG 94-98
14) Linking Climate Change and Walleye Population Dynamics in Lake Erie: An
Age-Structured Modeling Approach,  E. Marschall and Z. Shen.

SG 97-98
15) Investigation of Microbial Activity in Seeps Along Williams Ditch, R.
Sinsabaugh

SG 116-99
16) Maumee Area of Concern Uncontrolled Waste Site Database, B. MacDonald

SG 122-99
17) Pre-capping Characterization of the Macroinvertebrate Community, C.
Stephans.

ABSTRACTS

MICRO
1) Toxicity, Ecological Impact, Monitoring, Causes and Public Awareness of
Microcystis Blooms in Lake Erie, Dr. David A. Culver, Project Director;
Dept. of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State
University. Co-Investigators:  Drs. David B. Baker and R. Peter Richards;
Water Quality Lab., Heidelberg College; Drs. A.M. Beeton, Thomas H.
Johengen, George A. Leshkevich, and Henry A. Vanderploeg; NOAA/Great Lakes
Environmental Lab; Dr. Judith W. Budd,  Michigan Tech. University; Dr. W.W.
Carmichael, Wright State University; Drs. Rober T. Heath and Conrad E.
Wickstrom, Kent State University; Dr. Hugh J. MacIsaac, University of
Windsor; and Dr. Lin Wu, Mount Union College.

The large blooms of Microcystis that occurred in the western basin of Lake
Erie during August-October 1995 were unexpected. Over the last 25 years
cyanobacterial blooms have decreased in frequency while water quality of
Lake Erie has increased. Microcystis can produce virulent toxins that may
affect Lake Erie's ecosystem, including man. This report summarizes the
results of collaborative, comprehensive study to delineate the interactions
of this alga and its toxins with Lake Erie, monitor the frequency and
distribution of the blooms, examine their causes, and communicate the
results of our research to the lay public, Lake Erie managers, and the
scientific community.

A collaborative approach was adopted, involving 13 investigators from 7
institutions, plus many additional cooperators from federal, state,
provincial, and university institutions. The investigators studied toxicity
and ecosystem effects as a common series of sample sites and dates in the
Bass Islands. Microcystis was monitored in abundance both past and present
by reviewing samples collected by ship and remote sensing techniques. A
series of field and laboratory experiments was performed to determine the
causes of Microcystis blooms in Lake Erie. Work began June 1996 performing
most field data collections and experiments, followed by an additional
sampling period in 1997 and 1998, for a total duration of 30 months.

LEPF 11-94
2) A Demonstration of a Constructed Wetland for Home Wastewater Treatment,
Claude C. Custer, Jr., Project Director; Northeast Ohio Four County Regional
Planning (NEFCO.)

The purposes of a constructed wetland (CW) project was to demonstrate the
feasibility of a CW as an alternative system for failed on-lot wastewater
systems. The CW was constructed and monitored to document the progression of
the treatment as it responded to the biological dynamics in the CW. The
results of this project could be transferred to other areas of the Lake Erie
Basin which face limited options for treating waste from home septic
systems.

The constructed wetland was built on property owned by the City of Akron. A
home on the site had a failed septic system and off-lot discharge was
flowing into a tributary to the Cuyahoga River. The CW design is a two-cell
submerged flow constructed wetland system; a system adopted in part from
designs developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority. The media in the cells
consist of nearly 500 cubic feet of washed river gravel. The first cell is
about 14 feet wide and 19 feet long, and the second cell is 15 feet wide and
22 feet long. Wetland vegetation was planted in the first cell to treat the
wastewater flowing through the media. Permits for construction of the CW
were obtained from the Portage County Health Dept. and the State of Ohio
Dept. of Health. The constructed wetland was designated as an experimental
system.

LEPF 97-04
3) A Collaborative Demonstration and Deployment Project to Reduce Emissions
of the Suspected Human Carcinogen, Tetrachloroethylene, to Lake Erie and to
Ohio's Air, Water, and Soil, Joseph  Chadbourne, Project Director; CAMP,
Inc.

This project evolved logically from CAMP, Inc.'s "Organochlorine Project",
which officially started in 1995 with funding from the Gund Foundation,
Joyce Foundation, and the Great Lakes Protection Fund. Its purpose was to
identify opportunities to reduce emissions of persistent, toxic
bioaccumulating chemicals in the Great Lakes basin. The research and
planning work revealed data that have immediate concerns for the
environmental quality of Lake Erie and Ohio, their natural resources, as
well as the economic competitiveness of the state's industry. Initial
research found that four chemicals comprise most of the total quantity of
emissions of chlorinated solvents reported in the 1993 Toxic Release
Inventory. It was discovered that 40% of total U.S. releases of these
chlorinated solvents came from eight Great Lakes basin states alone. It is,
therefore, the dry cleaning industry's PCE emissions to Ohio's air, water,
and soil that was targeted in this Lake Erie Protection Fund project.

A wetcleaning process was developed. Wetcleaning is a process for cleaning
sensitive textiles (e.g. wool, silk, rayon, linen) in water by professionals
using special technology, detergents, and additives to minimize the
potential for adverse effects. It is followed by appropriate drying and
restorative finishing procedures. CAMP proposed a collaborative experiment
with Cleveland's Cuyahoga Community College to develop a modern wetcleaning
instructional and training laboratory, while CAMP demonstrated commercial
feasibility of the evolving wetcleaning process with dry cleaners.


LEPF 97-20
4) Implementation of a House Bill 110 Project in Ashtabula County, Raymond
J. Saporito, Health Commissioner and Project Director; Ashtabula County
Health Department.

The primary objective of this project was to improve water quality in the
major watersheds of Ashtabula County, which would ultimately improve the
water quality of Lake Erie. The Ashtabula County Health Dept. (ACHD)
completed its goal of identifying, inventorying and inspecting all
Semi-Public sewage disposal systems within the boundaries of the ACHD
district. A secondary goal of seeking replacement of a failing sewage system
or the repair of a broken sewage system has been partially accomplished.
After surveying Ashtabula County for two years, it was determined that 533
properties could be classified as having Semi-Public sewage disposal
systems, 73 are served by extended aereation package plants and the
remaining 460 are served predominantly by septic systems. An additional 30
to 40 systems were added to the inventory in 1999.  Most of the systems have
now been inspected twice.
License and registration records for each Semi-Public sewage system along
with owner addresses and phone numbers are kept on a computer. Hard copies
of all licenses, registrations and payment receipts are kept by the clerks.
These records have made it possible to respond to complaints, real estate
consultations, and advise the business community on new system criteria much
more quickly and efficiently.

LEPF 97-29
5) Transport of Particulate Pollutants in Lake Erie Tributaries: The Role of
Particle Size and Size-Specific Chemistry, Dr. R. Peter Richards, Project
Director, and Dr. David B. Baker, Water Quality Laboratory-Heidelberg
College.

Sediment is a major pollutant in its own right, as the cost associated with
dredging harbors and shipping channels demonstrate. Sediment is also the
most important carrier of many chemical pollutants, including phosphorus,
the limited nutrient for Lake Erie; many metals; and toxic organics such as
PCBs and DDT. Most sediment which reaches Lake Erie is of non-point origin,
and is transported through the tributaries primarily during periods of high
flow following storms. The research carried out in this project was designed
to gather information on chemical composition and particle size distribution
of a number of samples from Lake Erie tributaries, and to use the resulting
data to begin to assess these relationships. The goal of this project was to
seek a detailed understanding of the role played by sediment particle size
in the transport of sediment-bound (particulate) pollutants through Lake
Erie tributaries.

LEPF 97-30
6) Ecosystem Change in Lake Erie: Recolonization by Burrowing Mayflies and
their
     Contribution to Fish Diets, Dr. Kenneth A. Krieger, Project Director;
Water Quality
      Laboratory-Heidelberg College.

The goals of this project were to document the continued expansion of the
burrowing mayflies into suitable habitat in the western and central basins
of Lake Erie and to measure their role in the benthic-pelagic food web.
Three hypotheses were tested: (1) that the mayflies would continue to
increase in abundance and distribution in the western basin during the late
1990s; (2) that they would begin to repopulate the central basin in an
eastward direction during the late 1990s; and (3) that forage fishes
intermediate in the food web between benthic invertebrates and the
commercial and sport fishes would feed increasingly on the mayfly nymphs in
sediments in the western basin in 1997 and 1998, and in the nearshore zone
of the central basin in years 1997 through 1999.

LEPF 97-32
7) Yellow Creek Watershed - Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan - Phase
I, Claude C. Custer, Jr., Project Director; Northeast Ohio Four County
Regional Planning and Development Organization (NEFCO.)

This report serves as the Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan for Yellow
Creek in Medina and Summit Counties. It reflects the research efforts, by
NEFCO, for the purposes of protecting and improving water quality of the
Yellow Creek Watershed. Yellow Creek directly affects the water quality of
Lake Erie through its confluence with the Cuyahoga River. The Plan provides
a sound scientific basis from which to mold future land use decisions in the
Yellow Creek Watershed. The most prevalent problems in this watershed are
those associated with new development. These include the removal of riparian
and other healthy vegetation in favor of impervious surfaces and
construction which does not account for preventing excessive soil erosion.
Home sewage disposal systems present a challenge for keeping nutrient
pollution out of Yellow Creek and its tributaries. Current and future land
use decisions must be made with water quality in mind, so that communities
within the watershed will be able to ensure both adequate water quality and
habitat for future use and enjoyment.

SG 14-95
8) EROD Activity and P4501A Protein Content in Liver of Yellow Perch as
Biomarkers of PCBP Exposure, Drs. Henrka Dabrowska and Susan W. Fisher,
Project Directors; The Ohio State University-Dept. of Entomology.

Induction of the cytochrome P450 system by polyhalogenated aromatic
hydrocarbons (PHAHs) has been experimentally documented in a variety of
organisms as well as cell lines. This induction has been increasingly used
in environmental monitoring as an indicator of exposure to PHAHs. In fish,
as in other vertebrates, the PHAHs seem to have the same mode of action
mediated by the cytosolic Ah receptor. Several studies have shown that the
induction may differ between various classes of invertebrates and the
potency of induction vary among compounds. This research was intended to be
performed on individuals of one gender, yellow perch males rather than on
females in order to minimize the effect of other factors such as hormonal
status, which is known to influence CYPIA indices.

SG 34-96
9) Induced Spermiation and Characterization of Spermatozoa of the Sea
Lamprey, Dr. Konrad Dombrowski, Project Director; The Ohio State
University - School of Natural Resources. Co-Investigators: Dr. Jan
Glogowski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland; Dr. David Stetson, OSU; and
Susan Christ and Gregory Toth, Ohio EPA-Cincinnati, OH.

The invasion of the sea lamprey in the Great Lakes had a devasting impact on
lake trout, but also on all fish assemblages. With the opening of the St.
Lawrence Seaway, the non-indigenous sea lamprey gained access to the Great
Lakes in 1932. Current attempts to control lamprey are mainly; (1) treatment
of streams with lampricides to kill larvae; and (2) production and release
of sterile males to decrease spawning success. The objectives of this
project were to compare characteristics of sperm (volume, density, motility)
from hormone-injected animals with semen obtained from lampreys spawned in
the laboratory and to describe ultrastructure of spermatoza and basic
composition of seminal plasma.

SG 74-98
10)  Genetic Characterization of the Yellow Perch in Lake Erie, Dr. Carol A.
Stepien,
Project Investigator, Case Western Reserve University.

The primary objective of this project was to determine the levels of
mitochondrial
and nuclear DNA genetic variability and to assess the population genetic
structure of the yellow perch in Lake Erie. There have been few analyses of
the population genetics of yellow perch and none have examined DNA
sequences. The yellow perch is an environmentally important carnivore and
comprises a top commercial and sport fishery. The second objective was to
test whether there may be significant differences between yellow perch
population groups in the western versus eastern basins of Lake Erie.
Research found that DNA sequences from the mitochondrial DNA control region
and the nuclear LdhA6 intron both reveal significant genetic variability in
the yellow perch from Lake Erie. The data suggest that there are differences
between yellow perch population groups in the western versus eastern basins
of Lake Erie. The mtDNA revealed greater population variability in the
western basin and the nuclear DNA was more variable in the eastern basin,
suggesting possible sex differences.

SG 78-98
11)  West Creek Greenway, David J. Vasarhelyi, Project Director; West Creek
Preservation Committee.

West Creek is a tributary of the Cuyahoga River that flows through the
cities of Parma, Seven Hills, Independence and Brooklyn Heights, Ohio. The
West Creek Preservation Committee was formed in 1997 as a volunteer,
non-profit organization of local residents, seeking to facilitate the
conservation of natural, historical, and recreational resources and the
development of public greenspace within the West Creek Watershed.  The
objective of this project was to support public education activities that
would promote the concept and future development of the West Creek Preserve
and Greenway. The grant was instrumental in printing membership brochures
and issues of the West Creek Preservation Committee's newsletter, Notes from
West Creek. This included distribution to members and direct mailing
throughout the city of Parma. These quarterly updates were instrumental in
keeping the public informed and brought forth new members, volunteers and
business partners. There are currently over 500 active members of the West
Creek Preservation Committee.

SG 90-98
12) Economic Contribution of Recreational Boating in Ohio, Dr. Leroy J.
Hushak, Project Director; The Ohio State University.

This project consisted of three surveys being conducted to develop a
comprehensive database about recreational boating impacts in Ohio. The
primary and largest survey was of recreational boating households with boats
registered in Ohio. Second, a survey of the marine trades industry was
conducted. Marine trades is comprised of marinas, boat dealers, and related
businesses that support boating components, but excludes food service,
hotels and other business where recreational boaters spend money on boating
trips. The final survey was of charter fishing. This is technically a
commercial, not recreational, boating sector, but one which uses and is
linked closely to marine trades.

SG 92-98
13) Field Demonstration for Mechanical Control of Zebra Mussels, Tiao J.
Chang, Project Director; Ohio University-Dept. of Civil Engineering.

The objective of this project was installing a field demonstration of the
developed mechanical device, based on the mechanical regulation of dissolved
oxygen using a vacuum system for zebra mussel control in water conduits at a
water treatment plant.
The specific tasks included: (1) constructing the mechanical device using a
vacuum system for regulating the the dissolved oxygen of natural water; (2)
selecting a demonstration site at the Avon Lake Water Treatment Plant in
Avon Lake, OH. and plumbing the mechanical device for regulating the
dissolved oxygen of natural water taken from Lake Erie; and (3) connecting a
bio box to the mechanical device to demonstrate the effectiveness of the
device for dissolved oxygen regulation and zebra mussel control.

SG 94-98
14) Linking Climate Change and Walleye Population Dynamics in Lake Erie: An
Age-Structured Modeling Approach, Drs. Elizabeth Marschall and Zhengda Shen,
Project Directors; The Ohio State University-Aquatic Ecology Laboratory.

Walleye has been a valuable commercial and sport fish species in Lake Erie.
The Lake Erie walleye population is composed of both river-spawning and
reef-spawning stocks. Over the past century, walleye abundance has varied in
two ways: (1) within a small range of years, there has been great
year-to-year variability in recruitment success and total population size;
and (2) as biotic and abiotic conditions in the lake have changed over time,
there have been trends in walleye recruitment success and total abundance.
The overall goal with this project was a modeling approach to interpret the
meaning of variation and trends in Lake Erie walleye population dynamics
such that we can separate effects of management actions and other changes in
the lake from effects of random patterns in weather, and thereby increase
the credibility of management decisions.

SG 97-98
15) Investigation of Microbial Activity in Seeps Along Williams Ditch, Dr.
Robert Sinsabaugh, Project Director, and Christine M. Foreman and Racheal
Ammonette, The University of Toledo - Lake Erie Center.

Williams Ditch is located in the Arco Industrial Park in Toledo, Ohio. From
1932 through 1962, the Federal Creosoting Corp. and the American Creosoting
company operated a creosoting facility for railroad ties on this site. Due
to this past history, the site has been known to harbor creosote materials,
including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which pose environmental,
health, and safety concerns. Creosote is considered a potential human
carcinogen by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. This
project aimed at investigating the microbial consortia in the segment of
Williams Ditch that flows past this site. Beginning in July 1998, seven
surface water samples were collected and bacterial productivity levels,
extracellular enzyme activities, substrate utilization parameters and water
quality were measured.

SG 116-99
16) Maumee Area of Concern Uncontrolled Waste Site Database, Dr. Blair
MacDonald, The University of Toledo.

The objective of this project was to create a database of uncontrolled waste
sites within the Maumee Area of Concern. The database has been created
primarily to assist government agencies, environmental professionals, land
use planners, and citizens with interests in waste sites that operated prior
to government regulation or without regulatory permits. This database
information will be more accessible to a wider cross-section of the local
community and government agencies. The availability of this data will
promote further remediation of known sites, recording of other sites that
will invariably be discovered, and prevent future costly or hazardous
situations involving this waste. The database can also be used with an Ohio
EPA Geographic Information system for the Maumee Area of Concern to
visualize the data graphically and present site location on maps.

SG 122-99
17) Pre-capping Characterization of the Macroinvertebrate Community for the
Ottawa River Restoration, Casey Stephens, Project Director, City of Toledo.

This grant project funded a large portion of the City of Toledo's AquaBlok
application demonstration capping project on the Ottawa River, located in
northwestern Ohio. The project involved installation and field-scale testing
of three different AquaBlock based sediment cap designs installed along a
particular section of the river known to have elevated levels of PCBs in the
sediments. Cap installation activities occurred in September 1999. This
capping project was designed to evaluate cap effectiveness in physically
stabilizing sediment and minimizing its redistribution from this area of the
Ottawa River. Test results will provide useful pilot-scale information when
considering this capping technique as a remedial option for addressing
contaminated sediments throughout the river and in similarly impacted Lake
Erie tributaries.


/jw
October, 2000












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