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GLIN==> Up coming GLERL/CILER Seminar




GLERL-CILER SEMINAR SERIES

Title:  Synoptic Circulation Properties of the Great Lakes Region:
Review and Application.

Presented By:
        Robert V. Rohli
        Department of Geography and Anthropology
        Louisiana State University

When:   August 8, 2001, 10:30 a.m.

Where:  GLERL Main Conference Room
             2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
             Ann Arbor, MI

ABSTRACT
Synoptic climatology investigates the relationship between
atmospheric circulation and environmental properties.  To
accomplish this, the atmospheric circulation is often
classified into types, and differences in the properties of
the environmental feature(s) of interest are examined by
circulation category.  This presentation provides two
examples and applications of synoptic circulation
classification.  The first is a manual system devised for
daily surface circulation patterns over the Great Lakes
region.  A brief climatology of the derived weather types is
presented along with some applications.  The second example
is an automated circulation classification of both surface
and 700 mb flow patterns over eastern North America.  This
system is related to streamflow variability into the Great
Lakes.  The types of classification systems discussed may be
related to a vast array of environmental problems at
regional-to-hemispheric scales.

Contact:
        Dr. Brent Lofgren
        734-741-2382
        lofgren@glerl.noaa.gov


**********
Renda S. Williams
Executive Secretary to the Director
Phone: 734-741-2245
Fax: 734-741-2003
E-Mail: williams@glerl.noaa.gov



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