[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

GLIN==> Seminar Announcement (Ann Arbor, Mich.)



Posted on behalf of David Reid <David.Reid@noaa.gov>

---
NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES
SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT

WHEN:   MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2002

TIME:   2:00 P.M.

TITLE: "THE PONTO-CASPIAN REGION AS DONOR AND RECIPIENT OF BIOLOGICAL 
INVASIONS: CURRENT STATE AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES"

SPEAKER: Dr. Marina I. Orlova 
         Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. 
Petersburg, Russia 

WHERE: GLERL Main Conference Room
       2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
       Ann Arbor, MI  48105

ABSTRACT: The Caspian, Black, and Azov Seas and their estuaries 
comprise the modern Ponto-Caspian region. There are three groups of 
endemic species in this region: endemics in the Ponto-Azov basin 
proper, Caspian autochthonous fauna, and evolutionarily young estuarine 
liman relicts. The latter two faunal groups are considered the main 
sources of recent invasions in fresh and oligohaline waters of the 
Amphiatlantic, such as the Baltic Sea and North American Great Lakes.

The success of endemic Ponto-Caspian species' establishment in 
recipient regions is based on their biological characteristics and the 
availability of vectors and corridors of natural and human-mediated 
dispersal. Biodiversity in recipient ecosystems, similarity of 
environmental characteristics, and recent trends in ecosystem changes 
in both donor and recipient regions also contribute to invasion success.

The Ponto-Caspian Seas have also demonstrated high susceptibility as 
recipients of biological invasions, especially after opening of 
navigation through the Suez and Volgo-Don canals and intentional 
introductions of commercial organisms. Invasions in the Black and Azov 
seas are contributed mostly by coastal and estuarine species from North 
America, Indian and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans. The Caspian 
basin is a recipient of both primary and secondary invasions from the 
Ponto-Azov basin.

The role of inland invasion corridors between Ponto-Caspian seas and 
northern European basins is increasing and the Volga-Baltic waterway 
serves as a major south-to-north invasion corridor between the Ponto-
Caspian Seas and northwest Russia. However, the flow of species from 
north-to-south has been considerably less. Rapid intensification of 
human use of this corridor is expected in the near future. The 
intensification of vessel traffic to the eastern Baltic will inevitably 
increase the risk of primary bioinvasions to the Baltic basin from 
various geographical sources, particularly the Ponto-Caspian region. 
>From this perspective, the role of the Baltic Sea as a source of 
secondary invasions of European species to the Great Lakes basin may 
become more significant too. 

CONTACT: Dr. David Reid , NOAA/GLERL, 734-741-2019 




* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
glin-announce is hosted by the Great Lakes Information Network (GLIN):
http://www.great-lakes.net
To subscribe: http://www.glin.net/forms/glin-announce_form.html
To post a message: http://www.glin.net/forms/glin-announce_post.html
To search the archive: http://www.glin.net/lists/glin-announce/
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *