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GLIN==> Great Lakes Seminars - Ann Arbor, March 13 and 21



Posted on behalf of Dave Reid <David.Reid@noaa.gov>

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NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES

SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENTS (TWO)

TITLE:
"A HIGH-RESOLUTION RECORD OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN TROPICAL AFRICA SPANNING THE
PAST 25,000 YEARS"

SPEAKER:
Dr. Thomas Johnson
Professor and Director, Large Lakes Observatory, University of Minnesota.

WHEN:
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2002

TIME:
10:30 A.M.

WHERE:
GLERL Main Conference Room
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105

ABSTRACT:
A suite of piston cores recovered from the north basin of Lake Malawi, East
Africa, shows diatom productivity to have been lower during the last
glacial than during the Holocene. Superimposed on this glacial/interglacial
signal is one of millennial-scale variability, with higher diatom
productivity in the north Malawi basin when the Greenland Ice Core records
show relatively cool conditions. We also see the same pattern on a
centennial scale extending through the Little Ice Age back to the Medieval
Warm Period. We hypothesize that diatom productivity in the north basin
responds primarily to the frequency/intensity of north winds over the lake,
and that the Intertropical Convergence Zone swings farther south over
tropical Africa during relatively cool periods in the Northern Hemisphere.

CONTACT: Dr. Rochelle Sturtevant, NOAA/GLERL, 734-741-2287 or Dr. David
Reid (734-741-2019)


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TITLE:
"SUBMERGED IN HISTORY: WISCONSIN'S SHIPWRECKS, ARCHAEOLOGY, AND MARITIME
HISTORY"

SPEAKER:
Jefferson J. Gray
Wisconsin Historical Society.

WHEN:
THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2002

TIME:
10:30 A.M.

WHERE:
GLERL Main Conference Room
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105

ABSTRACT:
Wisconsin's lakes and rivers played a vital role in the state's
development. The state flag serves as a reminder; the prominently placed
sailor and anchor illustrate Wisconsin's strong tie to its maritime
resources. Shipwrecks are unique sites that contain a wealth of historical
and archeological information that are some of the last reminders of a time
when schooners and steamers ruled the Great Lakes. All told, over 700
shipwrecks and thousands of other archaeological sites in the 22-percent of
the state that is submerged. This illustrated lecture will explore Great
Lakes maritime History and underwater archaeology, as well as the efforts
of the Wisconsin Historical Society and UW Sea Grant Institute to study and
protect Wisconsin's underwater archaeological resources.

NOTE:  This seminar is cosponsored by the Thunder Bay National Marine
Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve, Alpena, Michigan.

CONTACT: Dr. Rochelle Sturtevant, NOAA/GLERL, 734-741-2287

Visit the NOAA Seminar Series web page at:
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/



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