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GLIN==> SEMINAR, APRIL 30, ANN ARBOR



NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES

SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT

TITLE:
"THE INVERSION OF OPTICAL MEASUREMENTS TO OBTAIN BIOGEOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS"

SPEAKER:
Dr. Ron Zaneveld
WET Labs/Oregon State University

WHEN:
TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2002

TIME:
2:00 P.M.

WHERE:
GLERL Main Conference Room
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105
For directions: http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/facil/triptik.html

ABSTRACT:
The spectral light scattering, absorption, and fluorescence characteristics
of natural waters- the Inherent Optical Properties, or IOP- are determined
by the distributions of particle size, complex index of refraction, and
shape, and the chemical characteristics of the dissolved materials. The
complex index of refraction of the particles in turn is determined by the
chemical nature of the particles, including pigments. Each component of the
IOP (light scattering at a given angle and wavelength, for example) depends
on a different mix of particulate and dissolved properties. This also means
that it may be possible to derive different particulate and dissolved
characteristics from different IOP measurements. The objectives of
measuring IOP in natural waters are twofold: 1) To measure those parameters
that affect radiative transfer, including optical remote sensing, and 2) To
determine characteristics of the particulate and dissolved materials by
inversion of the IOP. A list of parameters that can potentially be obtained
from specific measurable IOPs will be discussed. These include suspended
particle volume, particulate organic carbon, first order particle size
distribution, average particulate index of refraction, particulate pigment
concentrations, colored dissolved organic material concentration and
nature, hydrocarbon concentration, and bacterial concentration. Most
measurements to date have been made using research vessels and moorings.
New instrument platforms are under development, including profiling
(PALACE) floats, autonomous gliders, AUVs, diver operated systems, tow-yo
systems, automated underway systems, and autonomous profilers. These
require miniaturization of IOP sensors and reduced power consumption. This
new generation of IOP sensors and platforms will be discussed.

CONTACT: Dr. David Reid, NOAA/GLERL, 734-741-2019



--

David F. Reid
National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL)
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105-2945
Voice:  734-741-2019
FAX:    734-741-2003
Email:  David.Reid@noaa.gov
Visit the GLERL Website:
  http://www.glerl.noaa.gov



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