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GLIN==> Media Advisory -- ONE EYE FOR THE NATION, ONE FOR YOURSELF: SECURITY AND SAFETY ON THE GREAT LAKES



For immediate release


ONE EYE FOR THE NATION, ONE FOR YOURSELF: SECURITY AND SAFETY ON THE GREAT
LAKES


MADISON, Wis. (5/24/2002) -- Boaters on the Great Lakes this spring should
take to the water with an eye toward safety -- that of the nation as well as
their own, according to the U.S. Coast Guard and marine safety experts.


SECURITY ZONES AROUND NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS.

The U.S. Coast Guard has established unmarked security zones around the
power plants at Point Beach and Kewaunee, Wis.  Boaters are prohibited from
entering or moving within the zones.

The temporary zones are in effect until June 15, 2002.  The Coast Guard has
proposed making the security zones permanent.  The Point Beach zone would
extend 250 yards north and south of the power plant, and 250 yards offshore.
The Kewaunee zone would extend 250 years north and south of Observation
Point.  The northern edge would extend 150 yards from shore; the southern
edge 440 yards from shore.

There are no buoys to mark these zones, so boaters are advised to stay well
clear of both power plants.

Violation of the zone can result in a warning, a fine up to $10,000 and/or
up to 10 years imprisonment.

For further information contact:  U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office
Milwaukee, (414) 747-7155.  A U.S. Coast Guard news release on security
zones is available at www.uscg.mil/d9/wwm/mso/milwaukee.


MILWAUKEE HARBOR WATCH

The Coast Guard has launched a Homeland Security Harbor Watch in the
Milwaukee Harbor area.  The program encourages recreational boaters to watch
for anything suspicious, such as unattended vessels, unusual boat
characteristics, and fishing or hunting in unusual locations, according to
the Coast Guard.

The Coast Guard says boaters should also watch for any aggressive
activities, unusual filming or diving operations, and recovering or tossing
items into the waterway or onto shore.  Places of particular interest
include bridges, tunnels, locks, dams, power plants and water intakes.

While this program has been developed for the Milwaukee Harbor, boaters
everywhere on the Great Lakes should be alert for suspicious behavior, said
Chief David McClintock, U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office, Milwaukee.

Boaters should report any questionable behavior to the U.S. Coast Guard,
(800) 424-8802.

For further information contact:  U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office
Milwaukee, (414) 747-7155. A Harbor Watch flyer is available at
www.uscg.mil/d9/wwm/mso/milwaukee.


DANGEROUS BREAKING WAVES

Although water on Lake Michigan and Lake Superior is six to eight inches
higher than last spring, it is still below the long-term average level.  The
continued low levels increase the chances of dangerous breaking waves
forming outside of harbor entrances, according to Philip Keillor, UW Sea
Grant coastal engineering specialist.
	
Breaking waves are most likely to occur in approaches to harbors whose
channels are too shallow for large ocean freighters and lakers, Keillor
said.  Some breaking waves can develop very quickly and, for a few seconds,
can be nearly vertical walls of water, Keillor said.

"In just a couple hours, wave heights out on the lake can go from a couple
of feet to nine feet or more," Keillor said.  "When waves that high reach
shallow harbor entrances, they can form breakers and present a danger of
capsizing to recreational boaters."  

Boaters should carry marine radios and watch the weather closely, Keillor
said.  They should return to shore before large waves develop. If breaking
waves do form outside a harbor they wish to enter, they should go to the
nearest harbor with a wave-sheltered entrance or with deeper water in the
entrance and less chance of large breaking waves.

For further information contact:  Philip Keillor, UW Sea Grant coastal
engineering specialist, (608) 263-5133.


POTENTIALLY LETHAL COLD WATER

The cold water of the Great Lakes can disable a person quickly, according to
James Lubner, UW Sea Grant marine safety specialist.  "Cold water -- or even
cool water -- saps body heat 25 times faster than air of an equal
temperature," Lubner said.  "That makes water potentially dangerous, even at
70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit."

Surface temperatures of Lake Michigan near Milwaukee are currently in the
low 40s.  In Lake Superior they are in the upper 30s.

"You become completely helpless very, very quickly in water that cold,"
Lubner said.  Loss of limb movement happens first, with unconsciousness
following in 15-30 minutes.  Death can occur in less than an hour.  Precise
survival time depends on many factors, including water temperature, clothing
and physical condition.  

The most important steps boaters can take are wearing a personal flotation
device (PFD), moving carefully in the boat to avoid falling out and dressing
for the water temperature rather than the air temperature.

Lubner recommends that boaters leave a "float plan" with friends and family,
indicating where and when boaters plan to be on the water.  "And remember to
cancel the plan when you return," Lubner said.

For further information contact:  James Lubner, UW Sea Grant marine
education specialist, (414) 227-3291.  A fact sheet titled "Hypothermia:
Surviving in Cold Water" is available at
www.seagrant.wisc.edu/outreach/water_safety/ws_hypothermia.asp.

# # # #

Conceived in 1966, Sea Grant is a national network of 30 university-based
programs of research, outreach, and education dedicated to the protection
and sustainable use of the United States' coastal, ocean and Great Lakes
resources.  The National Sea Grant Network is a partnership of participating
coastal states, private industry and the National Sea Grant College Program,
National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce.

www.seagrant.wisc.edu

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