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GLIN==> Special ANS Seminar - June 2 (Ann Arbor)



Title:
Note:  this seminar announcement is the same information carried within the recent AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM announcement posted a few hours ago.  I apologize for any incovenience this double posting may cause.


NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/

The following is a special NOAA Great Lakes Seminar Series presentation for the State of Michigan's Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) Awareness Week.  This seminar will be the featured keynote presentation for the University of Michigan's Symposium on Aquatic Nuisance Species Research hosted by the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, as part of ANS Awareness Week.  

Title:  Predicting the Occurrence and Impact of Species Invasions in the Great Lakes

Speaker:  Dr. Anthony Ricciardi, Redpath Museum & McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal.

Symposium Time and Date:  3-5 p.m., Monday, June 2, 2003

Location:  Room 1040 Dana Bldg, University of Michigan (Ann Arbor)  
Directions to the Dana Building are available on the SNRE web site.

Abstract:
There have been over 170 documented species invasions in the Great Lakes basin.  One new invader has been discovered every seven months, on average, since the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway.  Each new invader is a potential threat to our fisheries, water supply systems, and biodiversity.  Although invasion ecology has become a burgeoning scientific discipline in the decades following the opening of the Seaway, aquatic resource managers have yet to be provided with adequate tools to deal with nonindigenous threats.   I will describe some of the challenges and future research directions toward predicting aquatic invasions.  There are some promising, but underexploited approaches to developing predictive models of occurrence and impact.  However, a major challenge to prediction and management are synergistic interactions among invaders.  If current trends persist, the incidence and magnitude of synergies will intensify, causing Great Lakes communities to become more frequently disrupted and more easily invaded over time--a phenomenon known as "invasional meltdown".  Therefore, even a modest reduction of the rate of species introduction could yield substantial benefits for the basin.
For information contact:

Colleen Vogler, CILER,  734-764-2426
David Reid, NOAA-GLERL, 734-741-2019



-- 
Posted by:
David F. Reid, Ph.D.
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105-2945
Voice:	734-741-2019
FAX:	743-741-2055
GLERL home page:
   http://www.glerl.noaa.gov

-- 
David F. Reid, Ph.D.
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105-2945
Voice:	734-741-2019
FAX:	743-741-2055
GLERL home page:
   http://www.glerl.noaa.gov
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