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GLIN==> June 2 Seminar - Ann Arbor



Title:
NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/


Date:
Monday, June 2, 2003

Title:
"CHARACTERIZATION OF HYDRODYNAMICS USING HGM AND ECOREGIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN "

Speaker:
David H. Merkey, M.L.A
CILER, University of Michigan

Time:
12:00 p.m.

Where:
GLERL Main Conference Room
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
For directions:
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/facil/triptik.html

Abstract:
Hydrology is important in determining aspects of wetland structure and function including vegetation patterns, quality of wildlife habitat, and nutrient cycling. Historically, obtaining hydrologic data was time consuming and expensive and only collected for a few, scattered wetlands. The hydrogeomorphic (HGM) wetland assessment method has recently been employed to understand and assess wetland hydrology and related functions across a broader scale than previously possible. The HGM method uses biogeographical regions (i.e., ecoregions) to characterize regional subclasses of wetlands within the HGM hierarchy. Albert has developed a system of ecological regions for Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota based on geology, climate, topography and other large-scale variables, many of which are important to wetland hydrology. To test the use of Alberts ecoregions for use in HGM, conductivity, alkalinity and monthly water levels were measured in 59 headwater and depressional wetlands in southeastern Michigan. Results show that wetland hydrodynamics vary with HGM class. Hydrodynamics in wetlands of the depressional class also varied among ecoregions, demonstrating that Alberts ecoregions would be useful as HGM biogeographical regions for this wetland type. Through the ability to characterize depressional wetland hydrodynamics, HGM can be useful in understanding patterns of wetland functions across the landscape. However, unlike results from previous studies, water chemistry showed no relationship to ecoregion or HGM classification. Wetland water chemistry may instead be a product of depth at which samples were taken, substrate type, location of sample points with the wetland, recent weather patterns, and/or anthropogenic inputs at the site scale.

For more information, contact:
David Merkey
734-741-2291
david.merkey@noaa.gov


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Posted by:

David F. Reid, Ph.D.
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105-2945
Voice: 734-741-2019
FAX: 743-741-2055
GLERL home page:
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov

 





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