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GLIN==> Seminar - June 30 (Ann Arbor)



Title:
NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/


Date:
Monday, June 30, 2003

Title:
"Report  of an Invasion: Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857), or Golden Mussel, in South America"

Speaker:
Dr. Gustavo Darrigran
Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo
Paseo del Bosque - La Plata (1900)
Argentina


Time:
10:30 a.m.

Where:
GLERL Main Conference Room
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
For directions:
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/facil/triptik.html

Abstract:
Darrigran and Pastorino (1995) proposed that the golden mussel, Limnoperna fortunei was unintentionally introduced unintentionally into America in 1991 through ballast waters of ocean vessels. The quick expansion of golden mussel distribution into inland waters of South America has caused  significant changes in natural and human environments. L. fortunei is provoking a new economic/environmental impact in South American freshwaters: macrofouling. It attaches to every natural hard substrate available (from trunks and aquatic plants to compact silt-sand), or to artificial ones (docks, tubes, walls, etc.). The combination of early sexual maturity, high fecundity, semelparity and wide environmental toleration allows L. fortunei to be transported and easily introduced into new environments. The impacts caused by this species can be similar to the impacts caused by the invasive bivalve species Dreissena polymorpha in the Northern Hemisphere. The probabilities of invasion of North America by L. fortunei will be greater than they were for South America.  South America was at risk only from vessels coming from southeast Asia, while North America is at risk from vessels acting as potential vectors for L. fortunei directly from southeast Asia, as well as from South America.  Likewise, the probabilities of invasion of South America by D. polymorpha would be greater than those of North America.  All this gives great importance to research conducted on the golden mussel in South America.  In Argentina, in La Plata University, we are working on different topics of its biology and on control bioassays.

For more information, contact:
Tom Nalepa (NOAA/GLERL)
thomas.nalepa@noaa.gov
734-741-2285


-- 
David F. Reid, Ph.D.
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105-2945
Voice:	734-741-2019
FAX:	743-741-2055
GLERL home page:
   http://www.glerl.noaa.gov