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GLIN==> Report of The Niagara River Toxics Committee, October 1984







A new historical Great Lakes Report has been placed on line.

Report of The Niagara River Toxics Committee, October 1984
The mutual concern of both Canadian and United States environmental
agencies regarding the water quality of the Niagara River resulted in a
decision to cooperate in a joint investigation of the toxic chemicals
entering the Niagara River.
                                                                       
 On it's route from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, the Niagara River passes through a complex of steel,
 petrochemical, and chemical manufacturing industries . The Niagara Frontier's proximity to a source of
 cheap electrical power and water for use in industrial processing has caused it to become a highly
 industrialized area, particularly on the U.S. side.    ... the occurrence of toxic chemicals in the
 Niagara River is a major public concern in both countries. While much has been accomplished, toxic
 substances remain a problem. The task is to assess what is there, identify the sources, implement
 additional appropriate abatement strategies, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies.
 http://www.epa.gov/glnpo/lakeont/nrtc/                                
                                                                       



_________________
Pranas Pranckevicius
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Great Lakes National Program Office
77 West Jackson Blvd.  G-17J
Chicago, IL  60604-3590
pranckevicius.pranas@epa.gov
312 353-3437 Tel
312 353-2018 Fax
www.epa.gov/glnpo/


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