[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

GLIN==> Correction - NOAA Great Lakes Seminar Series - February 26, 2004



Title:
Corrected Date from Subject line - seminar is scheduled for February 26.


NOAA GREAT LAKES SEMINAR SERIES
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/

Date:
Thursday, February 26, 2004

Time:
10:30 a.m.

Title:
"Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and
deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in Southern Lake
Michigan"

Speaker:
Cheegwan Lee
Research Associate
Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (CILER)
University of Michigan


Where:
GLERL Main Conference Room
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
For directions:
    http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/facil/triptik.html


Abstract
A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive+noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied to simulate quantitatively the March 1998 resuspension events in southern Lake Michigan. Some characteristics of model are capabilities to simulate several floc size classes, physically-based settling velocity formula, bed armoring, and sediment availability effect. Important resuspension parameters were estimated from field or laboratory measurements. Model results were verified with field measurements (ADCPs and sediment trap) and SeaWIFS satellite images. The model successfully reproduced the resuspension plume (observed by SeaWIFS satellite and field instruments) and recently measured sedimentation rate (using radiotracer techniques). Wave conditions and sediment properties (such as critical shear stress, fine sediment fraction, and limited sediment availability or source) determined the concentration distribution and width of resuspension plume. The modeled sedimentation shows the preferential accumulation of sediment on eastern side of the lake agreed with the recent measurement, despite a predominance of particles sources on the western side. Main physical mechanisms determining the sedimentation pattern are two counter-rotating gyres producing offshore mass transport around southeastern coast during northerly wind and settling velocity of
sediment flocs also controlling the dumping location.


For more information, contact:
Dr. David Schwab
NOAA/GLERL
734-741-2120
david.reid@noaa.gov


--
David F. Reid, Ph.D.
NOAA Seminar Series Co-Chair
Senior Research Scientist
Task Leader, GLERL Nonindigenous Species Program
Member, NOAA Invasive Species Matrix Program Management Team
Director, NOAA National Center for Research on Aquatic Invasive Species
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105-2945
Voice:	734-741-2019
FAX:	734-741-2055
GLERL home page:
   http://www.glerl.noaa.gov

-- 
David F. Reid, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
Task Leader, GLERL Nonindigenous Species Program
Member, NOAA Invasive Species Matrix Program Management Team
Director, NOAA National Center for Research on Aquatic Invasive Species
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.
Ann Arbor, MI  48105-2945
Voice:	734-741-2019
FAX:	734-741-2055
GLERL home page:
   http://www.glerl.noaa.gov