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GLIN==> Fw: Wind Power News, Announcements, Updates, and Towards Wildlife Friendly Wind Power Conference




Thanks to John, Linda, Megan, Bob, Marcia, Alex, Beth, Jane, Rachel, Bill,
Dan, and others for contributing.  Our "Towards Wildlife Friendly Wind
Power:  A Focus on the Great Lakes" Conference is already getting positive
play in the media.   Hope to see you all in Toledo June 27-29!
http://www.fws.gov/midwest/greatlakes/windpower.htm

Rich

Richard Greenwood
    USFWS Liaison to USEPA Great Lakes National Program Office
    Team Leader Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Team
Great Lakes National Program Office
77 West Jackson Blvd. (G-17J)
Chicago, IL 60604
Ph:  312-886-3853  Fax:  312-353-2018
Email:  rich_greenwood@fws.gov or greenwood.richard@epa.gov
http://greatlakes.fws.gov/


Forwarding a message from Bill Evans who will be a speaker at the Toledo
Towards Wildlife Friendly Wind Power: A Focus on the Great Lakes
Conference.
The link below is currently one of the top 7 Yahoo.com news items:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060606/ap_on_re_us/great_lakes_windmills




By TODD RICHMOND, Associated Press Writer Tue Jun 6, 4:47 PM ET


ALGOMA, Wis. - A little red lighthouse. Boardwalks. The blue-green waters
of Lake Michigan stretching to the horizon. It's just another
pretty-as-a-postcard view on the shores of this sleepy town of 5,700 a
half-hour east of Green Bay. But how long the unspoiled vista in Algoma and
in other communities along the Great Lakes will last is anybody's guess.
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            



Government and industry officials are set to meet in Madison and Toledo,
Ohio, this month to talk about the prospects for installing giant
electricity-generating windmills out in the Great Lakes.  Advocates say
offshore wind turbines would be an efficient means of producing power.
Opponents fear the windmills would harm the lakes' natural beauty and hurt
tourism and fishing.


"I'll fight this every way I can," said Algoma Alderman Ken Taylor,
chairman of the city's marina committee. "The beautiful view we have would
be destroyed. ... How many are going to come here if we have these things
off our coastline?"


The rows of windmills would tower as high as 400 feet and float or stand in
relatively shallow water.


Winds over water are generally stronger, less turbulent and more consistent
than those on land, said Walt Musial, senior engineer and offshore programs
leader for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of
Energy contractor.


Major population and industrial centers such as Cleveland, Chicago, Gary,
Ind., and Milwaukee are situated on the Great Lakes' shores, reducing the
need for long-distance transmission.


"Offshore machines can make about twice as much as onshore," said Musial,
who will make a presentation at a June 14 conference at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison. "It's a potentially big resource for renewable energy.
You want to generate the electricity close to where people are going to use
it."


The UW-Madison conference will look at such things as efforts to gather
wind data on the Great Lakes, technological barriers to offshore wind
farms, and the political policies needed to spur their development.


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Environmental Protection Agency
are among the agencies sponsoring the June 27-29 session in Toledo.
Discussions are set on how to protect birds, bats and fish from the
windmills.


European countries such as Denmark and Britain have developed wind farms in
the North and Baltic seas. A Houston energy company plans to build a
170-turbine farm in the Gulf of Mexico off Texas' Padre Island. An
additional 50 turbines are planned off Galveston, Texas. East Coast
offshore projects have been proposed off Long Island and Cape Cod.


But the idea has been slow to catch on around the Great Lakes. Michigan,
Ohio and Wisconsin regulators said they have yet to be approached by any
energy companies with proposals for offshore windmills in the Great Lakes.


Some utilities consider the technology unproven and say the financial risks
and the bureaucratic hurdles are too high.


Rob Benninghoff, director of renewable and special projects for Wisconsin
Public Service Corp., which supplies power to much of northeastern
Wisconsin, including the Green Bay area, said the utility is reluctant for
now to pour ratepayers' money into what would be a difficult approval
process.


"I see it as a high-risk proposition," Benninghoff said. "I don't know of
anyone who's got any plans to do anything in Lake Michigan or the bay or
anything. Not to say it won't move in that direction ultimately."


Besides having to shoulder the construction costs — the Padre Island
project, for example, is expected to cost $1 billion to $2 billion —
developers also would have to get federal and state permits.


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has jurisdiction over structures in the
lakes. Developers also would have to lease tracts of lake bottom from the
states, and state utility regulators would have to sign off.


Hanging over every proposal would be concerns about fish, lake bottoms and
migratory birds. And then there are worries about the view.


"That's the No. 1 problem we face today in getting this industry started,"
Musial said. "Visual pollution is preventing the country from embracing
them."





NOTE THAT Kevin Rackstraw, Regional Manager of Clipper Windpower, is a
speaker at the Toledo "Towards Wildlife Friendly Wind Power: A Focus on the
Great Lakes Conference"
(Embedded image moved to file: pic04966.jpg)
June 6, 2006
Debate Over Wind Power Creates Environmental Rift
By FELICITY BARRINGER


OAKLAND, Md. — Dan Boone has no doubt that his crusade against wind energy
is the right way to protect the Allegheny highlands he loves. Let other
environmentalists call him deluded at best, traitorous at worst. He remains
undeterred.


For four years or more, Mr. Boone has traveled across the mid-Atlantic to
make every argument he can muster against local wind-power projects: they
kill birds and bats; they are too noisy; they are inefficient, making no
more than a symbolic contribution to energy needs.


Wind farms on the empty prairies of North Dakota? Fine. But not, Mr. Boone
insists, in the mountainous terrain of southwestern Pennsylvania, western
Maryland or West Virginia, areas where 15 new projects have been proposed.
If all were built, 750 to 1,000 giant turbines would line the hilltops,
most producing, on average, enough electricity to power 600 homes.


Wind projects are in the midst of a huge growth spurt in many parts of the
country, driven by government incentives to promote alternatives to fossil
fuels. But Mr. Boone, who wields a botanist's trowel and a debater's knife
with equal ease, wants to slow them down with community activism,
regulatory action and legal challenges.


His crusade harks back to the campaigns against nuclear power plants,
toxic-waste dumps and dams on scenic rivers that were building blocks of
the modern environmental movement. But the times, and the climate, are
changing. With fears of global warming growing more acute, Mr. Boone and
many other local activists are finding themselves increasingly out of step
with the priorities of the broader movement.


National groups like Greenpeace and the Sierra Club used to uniting against
specific projects are now united for renewable energy in general. And they
are particularly high on wind power — with the caveat that a few, but only
a few, special places should be turbine-free.


"The broader environmental movement knows we have this urgent need for
renewable energy to avert global warming," said John Passacantando,
executive director of Greenpeace U.S.A. "But we're still dealing with
groups that can't get their heads around global warming yet."


Indeed, the best winds, especially in the East, tend to blow in places that
are also ideal for hiking, sailing, second homes and spirit-soothing views.
These include the Green Mountains, the Adirondacks, the Chesapeake Bay,
Cape Cod and the ridges of northern Appalachia. Local opposition to
unwanted development remains a potent force.


So when it comes to wind, the environmental movement is riven with
dissonance and accusations of elitism. Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s very public
opposition to the 130-turbine Cape Wind energy facility proposed off
Nantucket Sound has driven a wedge between activists. Dan Boone's circuit
riding against wind projects, while not attracting the same celebrity
notice, has exasperated many Sierra Club compatriots even more.


Like Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Boone says the areas he wants to protect are uniquely
vulnerable. His family owns property near the proposed projects, just as
Mr. Kennedy's does near the Cape Wind site.


But Mr. Boone says that wind supporters are the ones pursuing their own
agenda at the expense of the public interest.


"I'm not sure that wind turbines in this region will significantly reduce
the outcome of global climate change or actually have any role," Mr. Boone
said. "The very limited benefit doesn't justify the risk of wiping out a
lot of interior forest habitat."


National environmental leaders reject this argument.


"There's no free lunch," said Paul Hansen, executive director of the Izaak
Walton League of America, a venerable sportsmen's group. " 'Not in my
backyard' is not environmentalism."


The Alleghenies are a big backyard, with views that are both spectacular
and problematic. Flowering shrubs like shadbush and preening flowers like
trillium are framed by oaks, maples and longleaf pines. But intermittent
industrial tree farming has repeatedly denuded some mountainsides. On both
sides of the border near here in far western Maryland, second-home
development is booming. The air has often been fouled by the Mount Storm
coal-fired power plant.


If Ned Power, a wind-energy development company, puts up 100 or so turbines
along 14 miles of ridgeline near Mount Storm, wind-energy supporters say,
how much does that further spoil the landscape?


Kevin Rackstraw, a regional manager of Clipper Windpower whose proposed
40-turbine project in western Maryland has drawn Mr. Boone's fire, said
opponents lacked perspective.


"Dan looks at all the impacts of a given wind project," Mr. Rackstraw said,
"but doesn't say: 'If we didn't have wind, what would we have?' Coal. Think
of the impact of acid rain and mountaintop removal."


The Ned Power project is just one target of Mr. Boone, 49, a former state
wildlife biologist who now works as a consultant. In interviews, he said he
first focused on the issue when working as a botanist on a study related to
an early wind power project. The environmental-impact statements, he said,
were grossly inadequate.


Now he drives from Highland County in western Virginia (where 38 turbines
are proposed on Tamarack Ridge) to Bedford, Pa. (where early discussions of
an unnamed project are under way) to talk to local groups or crystallize
their objections for them. In Annapolis, Md., and Charleston, W.Va., he
uses state utility regulators' licensing hearings to throw up roadblocks
before wind projects. He is eager to argue with industry officials in any
venue, questioning their facts, assumptions and motives.


"The rush is on now because a lot of the places they've targeted have no
zoning, and it's easy to get in that kind of large-scale development," he
said. "This part of the country has really good energy prices. Developers
are keying in on that."


Mr. Boone's quiver of anti-wind arguments includes economic analyses, but
his first line of attack is biological: he contends that they are a threat
to bats and potentially to migratory birds and that they break up forest
habitat.


Scores of raptors and other birds were killed by the first generation of
wind turbines set up at Altamont Pass in Northern California. Since the
Altamont Pass turbines were erected in the early 1980's, turbine design has
been altered, and most subsequent studies have shown that birds tend to fly
above the height of most turbines though some experts say more studies are
needed.


But the turbines south of here in Thomas, W.Va., have been lethal to bats.
More than 2,000 were killed in 2003 at the Mountaineer project, whose 44
turbines are owned by FPL Energy, a big power company that is the wind
industry's dominant player.


Industry officials agree that the bat mortality measured at the Mountaineer
site is unacceptable, and they are studying the benefits of deterrent
devices and the best ways to modify turbine operations in bat-rich areas.


To Mr. Boone, wind energy will never make a big enough difference to
justify its impact in the region. "You have to remember that these tax
advantages are so huge," he said, "that these developers are keen to latch
onto all the mythology — whether it's global warming or something else."


Asked if he thought global warming was a myth, he said: "No, I'm not
calling it mythology." But industry officials, he contended, will "take
things out of context."


Mike Tidwell, the director of Chesapeake Climate Action Network and one of
Mr. Boone's adversaries, bristles at the attack. "Wind industry guys are
the straightest-shooting people," Mr. Tidwell said. "Most got into it
because they had an environmental ethic."


But Mr. Boone has plenty of allies, too. "He's the greatest naturalist I've
even known," said Betsy Johnson, chairwoman of the Maryland chapter of the
Sierra Club. "Dan has been very helpful in educating us with what problems
there can be with an energy source like wind."


The industry Mr. Boone regards so suspiciously is on a roll. The total
share of energy that wind farms generated nationwide in 2004 was tiny —
about one-third of 1 percent, according to the Energy Department. But by
2020, according to industry estimates, wind's share of the county's energy
portfolio could grow ten- or twentyfold.


For the environmental movement, wind supporters say, the transition from
the protection of place to the protection of planet is bound to be
wrenching.


"Wilderness conversations are spiritual," said David Hamilton, the Sierra
Club's national director of global warming and energy programs. "We've
always been a place-based organization, protecting places," but "protecting
our climate" is "just looking at it from a different angle and a different
elevation."

Greenwire – 6/6/06

WIND POWER: Industry, DOE to craft 'action plan' for growth


Ben Geman, Greenwire senior reporter


Wind industry and Energy Department officials said yesterday they will
craft an "action plan" aimed at vastly increasing the amount of
wind-generated electricity in the United States.


The effort -- announced at a major wind energy conference in Pittsburgh --
will seek input from environmentalists, utilities, policymakers, investors
and others, according to the American Wind Energy Association.


The goal is to eventually bring wind power's share of U.S. electricity
generation to 20 percent. Last year wind power accounted for less than half
of 1 percent of the nation's electric generation, DOE says. The plan is set
to be unveiled a year from now at the WINDPOWER 2007 conference in Los
Angeles, AWEA said.


Industry officials said there are opportunities for continued strong
growth, but challenges loom, including raw materials costs and the need for
certainty in federal tax policy. The current wind energy production tax
credit is in place through 2007.


AWEA has forecast that 2006 will be a record year for the industry. FPL
Energy, a major player in the wind market, announced yesterday that it
expects its wind portfolio to exceed 4,000 megawatts by the end of this
year, representing a roughly $4 billion investment.


WIND POWER: U.K. firms attempts turbine redesign for urban areas


U.K. design and development company XCO2 said last week that it has a new
wind turbine design that would make it a quiet device designed to perform
well in urban areas.


The company's Quiet Revolution turbines are five meters tall without a pole
and are capable of producing 10,000 kilowatts per year on an average wind
speed of 5.8 meters per second. XCO2 says the turbine's triple helix form
and vertical axis make it almost silent and allow it to perform better in
urban areas where wind direction can vary.


The company plans to install the turbines in the next few months in
Bristol, Swindon and London (John Vidal, London Guardian, June 2). -- RJD


                                  AGENDA
                                 D-R-A-F-T

                       June 16, 2006  noon to 4 p.m.

       Michigan Renewable Energy Program Legislative Update Meeting
              at Grand Valley State University MAREC Facility


Noon – Brownbag lunch, $10.00 charge per person.  RSVP to Sarah Lineberry
      at MAREC: email linebers@gvsu.edu or phone 616-331-6906.

1:00 –      Registration and Networking

1:30 –      Introduction: J. Peter Lark, Chairman, Michigan Public Service
      Commission

1:45 –      Legislative Update: State Representative Bill Huizenga

2:15 –      MAREC Update: Dr. Imad Mahawili, Executive Director
      SmartZone/MAREC

2:30 –      Tours of MAREC and Michigan Renewable Energy Program (MREP)
      Committee Meetings.

      ½-hour MAREC tours will be offered at 2:30, 3:00, and 3:30 p.m.

      MREP committees will meet in MAREC classrooms, from 2:30 to 3:30 or
      from 3:00 to 4:00.   Specific committee meetings to be determined and
      listed on final agenda.

4:00 –      Adjourn


Wyandotte, Michigan Wind Generators
http://www.thenewsherald.com/stories/060406/loc_20060604005.shtml


Ontario Great Lakes Offshore Wind Energy Project Could Surpass 700 MW
http://renewableenergyaccess.com/rea/news/story?id=45079

Wind Energy Data Needs by June 16

This message is intended for those wind energy developers who have been
collecting meteorological data at Michigan sites for at least several
months by now.

Data on wind resources is needed to verify and update the assessment
completed for the Michigan Capacity Need Study.  MPSC Staff  has proposed
that developers share their met-tower data with MPSC Staff, under a
confidentiality agreement.  Staff believes a standard confidentiality form
can be used to exempt any Met Tower data from disclosure. (Copies of the
standard form are available via email to anyone who needs one.  Please
request one from tstanton@michigan.gov if needed.)
Once the data is received, MPSC Staff will use it to develop average wind
speed information (especially at the 70-meter height) for the purposes of:

(1) developing average Effective Load Carrying Capacity (ELCC) estimates
for wind energy systems deployed in each of three Michigan regions
identified for the Capacity Need Forum (that is, generally speaking, the
ITC service territory (Southeastern Michigan and Thumb area); METC service
territory (balance of Lower Peninsula); and ATC service territory (Upper
Peninsula);
(2) analyzing Michigan transmission system(s) for the possible effects of
injecting various quantities of wind energy into the grid at various
locations.
(3) possibly verifying 70-meter data reported in the NREL/AWS TrueWind map
for Michigan;

By agreeing to keep Met Tower data confidential and obtaining the waiver
from Freedom of Information Act disclosure, MPSC Staff believes wind
developers would have ample assurance that specific details by which any
specific company's data could be identified will not be released.

MPSC Staff is asking the wind developers to:

(1) Let us know by Friday June 9 whether they plan to cooperate with this
data gathering and analysis process;
(2) Provide the data by Friday June 16;
(3) Participate in a review of the analytical methods used to establish the
averages; and
(4) Review and comment on the MPSC Staff draft report on these subjects.

We are anxious to obtain the data in time that the analysis for (1) and
perhaps (2) can be completed by not later than June 30, so that findings
can be utilized in modeling for the 21st Century Energy Plan. MPSC Staff
has been told by some Michigan wind developers that the CNF assumptions
were too conservative; that there is a larger wind resource available for
development in Michigan.  We need to be able to verify that impression,
though, by analyzing better data.  If the data is not forthcoming from
Michigan wind developers, then there is a very real possibility that the
21st Century Energy Plan will rely on the data already collected and
reported through the Capacity Need Forum.

-- Tom Stanton, Coordinator
   Michigan Renewable Energy Program -- http://www.michigan.gov/mrep
   Michigan Public Service Commission Staff
   voice 517-241-6086
   mailto:tstanton@michigan.gov




                                                                             
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|                                                                           |Dear Richard,                                  |(Embedded    |
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|                                                                           |Wind energy deployment has increased           |pic31115.gif)|
|                               (Embedded image moved to file: pic02082.gif)|exponentially over the past few years. Many    |             |
|                                                                           |states are beginning to explore the possibility|             |
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|                             More Information                              |well as on land. Could the Great Lakes provide |             |
|                                   Rates                                   |an opportunity for more wind development in the|             |
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|                               Member: $180                                |                                               |             |
|                         Government/Non-profit:$60                         |This conference will discuss whether building  |             |
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|                                                                           |viable and sustainable energy option.          |             |
|                                 Speakers                                  |                                               |             |
|                                                                           |Please join us:                                |             |
|                                                                           |                                               |             |
|      John Dunlop                                                          |                                               |             |
|      American Wind Energy Association                                     |                                               |             |
|      Walt Musial                                                          |             Offshore Wind Energy              |             |
|      National Renewable Energy Laboratory                                 |         Turbines in the Great Lakes?          |             |
|      Bonnie Ram                                                           |                                               |             |
|      Energetics                                                           |                                               |             |
|      Alex DePillis                                                        |      Conference Discussions will include:     |             |
|      Seventh Generation Energy Systems                                    |            Prospects for Offshore Wind Energy |             |
|      Mark Eilers                                                          |            Development                        |             |
|      General Electric                                                     |            Offshore Wind Technologies         |             |
|      Robert Owen                                                          |            Regional Initiatives and Study     |             |
|      Superior Safety and Environmental Services                           |            Groups                             |             |
|      David Blecker                                                        |            Technological Requirements and     |             |
|      Seventh Generation Energy Systems                                    |            Barriers                           |             |
|      Steven Ugoretz                                                       |            A Viable Wind Energy Legal         |             |
|      Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources                            |            Framework                          |             |
|      Kim Zuhlke                                                           |                                               |             |
|      Alliant Energy                                                       |                                               |             |
|      Kate Gordon                                                          |(Embedded image moved to file: pic04833.gif)   |             |
|      The Apollo Alliance                                                  |Offshore Turbine                               |             |
|      Cheryl Rezabek                                                       |DATE: June 14th, 2006                          |             |
|      Wisconsin Division of Energy                                         |TIME: 8:30am-3:30pm                            |             |
|                                                                           |LOCATION: Fluno Center-Madison, WI             |             |
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 GSA REQUESTS FUNDING PROPOSALS                                             
                                                                            


Federal Renewables in the Great Lakes Region
The U.S. General Services Administration requests proposals to provide
electric power to Federal facilities in GSA's Great Lakes Region.  The
approximate total annual electric requirement is 175,676,000 kWhs.  The
Government has divided its requirement into three pricing groups which each
contain a requirement for renewable power.  For the purposes of this
contract, "renewable energy" includes electricity generated from solar,
wind, biomass, landfill gas, ocean (tidal, wave, current, and thermal),
geothermal, municipal solid waste, or new hydroelectric generation capacity
achieved from increased efficiency or additional new capacity at an
existing hydroelectric project.  Responses due 6/16/06.  For more info,
contact Ken Shutika at ken.shutika@gsa.gov or go to:
http://www2.fbo.gov/spg/GSA/PBS/NCR/GS%2D00P%2D06%2DBSD%2D0398/listing.html
.


Talk Swirls Over Great Lakes Windmills

   TODD RICHMOND
   Associated Press


   ALGOMA, Wis. - A little red lighthouse. Boardwalks. The blue-green
   waters of Lake Michigan stretching to the horizon. It's just another
   pretty-as-a-postcard view on the shores of this sleepy town of 5,700
   a half-hour east of Green Bay. But how long the unspoiled vista in
   Algoma and in other communities along the Great Lakes will last is
   anybody's guess.

   Government and industry officials are set to meet in Madison and
   Toledo, Ohio, this month to talk about the prospects for installing
   giant electricity-generating windmills out in the Great Lakes.


   Advocates say offshore wind turbines would be an efficient means of
   producing power. Opponents fear the windmills would harm the lakes'
   natural beauty and hurt tourism and fishing.

   "I'll fight this every way I can," said Algoma Alderman Ken Taylor,
   chairman of the city's marina committee. "The beautiful view we have
   would be destroyed. ... How many are going to come here if we have
   these things off our coastline?"


   The rows of windmills would tower as high as 400 feet and float or
   stand in relatively shallow water.


   Winds over water are generally stronger, less turbulent and more
   consistent than those on land, said Walt Musial, senior engineer and
   offshore programs leader for the National Renewable Energy
   Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy contractor.


   Major population and industrial centers such as Cleveland, Chicago,
   Gary, Ind., and Milwaukee are situated on the Great Lakes' shores,
   reducing the need for long-distance transmission.


   "Offshore machines can make about twice as much as onshore," said
   Musial, who will make a presentation at a June 14 conference at the
   University of Wisconsin-Madison. "It's a potentially big resource for
   renewable energy. You want to generate the electricity close to where
   people are going to use it."


   The UW-Madison conference will look at such things as efforts to
   gather wind data on the Great Lakes, technological barriers to
   offshore wind farms, and the political policies needed to spur their
   development.


   The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Environmental Protection
   Agency are among the agencies sponsoring the June 27-29 session in
   Toledo. Discussions are set on how to protect birds, bats and fish
   from the windmills.


   European countries such as Denmark and Britain have developed wind
   farms in the North and Baltic seas. A Houston energy company plans to
   build a 170-turbine farm in the Gulf of Mexico off Texas' Padre
   Island. An additional 50 turbines are planned off Galveston, Texas.
   East Coast offshore projects have been proposed off Long Island and
   Cape Cod.

   But the idea has been slow to catch on around the Great Lakes.
   Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin regulators said they have yet to be
   approached by any energy companies with proposals for offshore
   windmills in the Great Lakes.


   Some utilities consider the technology unproven and say the financial
   risks and the bureaucratic hurdles are too high.


   Rob Benninghoff, director of renewable and special projects for
   Wisconsin Public Service Corp., which supplies power to much of
   northeastern Wisconsin, including the Green Bay area, said the
   utility is reluctant for now to pour ratepayers' money into what
   would be a difficult approval process.

   "I see it as a high-risk proposition," Benninghoff said. "I don't
   know of anyone who's got any plans to do anything in Lake Michigan or
   the bay or anything. Not to say it won't move in that direction
   ultimately."

   Besides having to shoulder the construction costs - the Padre Island
   project, for example, is expected to cost $1 billion to $2 billion -
   developers also would have to get federal and state permits.

   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has jurisdiction over structures in
   the lakes. Developers also would have to lease tracts of lake bottom
   from the states, and state utility regulators would have to sign off.

   Hanging over every proposal would be concerns about fish, lake
   bottoms and migratory birds. And then there are worries about the
   view.

   "That's the No. 1 problem we face today in getting this industry
   started," Musial said. "Visual pollution is preventing the country
   from embracing them."

   ON THE NET

   Wisconsin Focus on Energy: http://www.focusonenergy.com

   Cape Wind: http://www.capewind.org
              (Embedded image moved to file: pic17540.gif)


Talk swirls over Great Lakes windmills
----------------------------------------
Government and industry officials are set to meet in Madison and Toledo,
Ohio,
this month to talk about the prospects for installing giant
electricity-generating windmills out in the Great Lakes. Source: The
Washington
Post (6/6)
Wind farms interfering with radar systems?
----------------------------------------
Many wind farm projects are on hold right now as the federal government
examines possible interference with military radar installations. Source:
Great Lakes Radio Consortium (5/22)

Wind project planned in Lake Ontario
----------------------------------------
A Toronto company wants to erect more than 140 massive wind turbines down
the middle of Lake Ontario in what would become the largest wind farm in
North America. Source: The Toronto Star (5/31)

Some want to tap wind on Great Lakes
----------------------------------------
Wind energy advocates say offshore wind turbines on the Great Lakes would
be
a power-generation jackpot, but opponents fear the potential impact on the
lakes' aesthetics, tourism and fishing. Source: Duluth News Tribune (5/29)

WIND POWER: Mass. developer offers alternative to Cape Wind plan


As lawmakers continue to battle over the proposed offshore wind farm in
Nantucket Sound, a Massachusetts developer has offered a new plan to build
up to 120 wind turbines in nearby Buzzards Bay.


The $750 million proposal by Boston-based Patriot Renewables calls for
between 90 and 120 450-foot turbines located as close as two miles off the
coast of Fairhaven and Dartmouth. Buzzards Bay lies just outside New
Bedford Harbor.


According to project developers, the South Coast Offshore Wind Project
would generate about 300 megawatts of electricity -- about 70 percent of
what the Cape Wind turbines would generate -- though still enough to power
300,000 homes.


The proposal comes as plans for the Cape Wind facility remain stalled, as
developers continue to seek regulatory approval from state and federal
agencies. Many officials, including Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (R),
have criticized the Nantucket Sound proposal. Lawmakers said they would
like to hear more about the Buzzards Bay plan.


"Wind is an important alternative source of energy, which Gov. Romney
supports," said Romney spokesman Eric Fehrnstrom. "We think the proposed
Buzzards Bay wind farm is an intriguing idea and we're anxious to learn
more about it."


"There's a lot that we still need to hear on this proposal -- from the
fishing industry, the recreational users and some of the environmental
analysts," said state Rep. William M. Straus (D). "Buzzards Bay, even
though it may not look it on a map, is a fairly narrow, congested waterway,
and when things go wrong, navigationally or environmentally, there are big
impacts very quickly. So they have a hill to climb here" (Michael Levenson,
Boston Globe, May 24).


Construction contractor Jay Cashman said he hopes to avoid some of the
controversy generated by the Cape Wind project by working closely with
environmental groups, fishers, ferry operators and lawmakers (Timothy C.
Barmann, Providence Journal, May 24). -- DRL




Transmission Committee--
Yesterday the Utility Wind Integration Group released a very important
document, a 4 page summary of the state of the art in wind integration.
IT IS A MUST READ!!!  It was written by UWIG in cooperation with the
Edison Electric Institute, the National Rural Electric Cooperative
Association, and the American Public Power Association which together
represent nearly 100% of the U.S. electric industry.  The document
provides a concise set of authoritative statements on wind's reliability
FROM THE UTILITIES PERSPECTIVE.  UWIG's Charlie Smith and Ed DeMeo,
along with some helpful utilities slogged through the difficult process
of negotiating the language with these associations and deserve a lot of
credit.  AWEA believes this document will be of great use in
interactions with utilities, regulators, other policy makers, NIMBYs,
the press, and the general public.  We hope it is of great use to you in
your company's interactions with these audiences as well.  Please spread
it far and wide.

UWIG press release, also pasted below.
http://www.uwig.org/IntegrationStateoftheArt.htm

The document:
http://www.uwig.org/UWIGWindIntegration052006.pdf

UWIG statement:

UWIG Issues Assessment of Integration of Wind into Utility Power Systems
Document Presents Consensus that Impacts of Wind on Power Systems Can be
Managed with Proper Design and Operation

Dallas, Texas * May 22, 2006 * The Utility Wind Integration Group (UWIG)
today announced the release of an assessment on the integration of wind
generation into utility power systems. The document, titled "Utility
Wind Integration State of the Art," was introduced at the IEEE Power
Engineering Society Transmission and Distribution Conference in Dallas.

The assessment summarizes a number of the key points raised in a series
of articles on wind integration that appeared in the November/December
issue of the IEEE Power Engineering Society's Power & Energy Magazine.
UWIG produced the summary in cooperation with the American Public Power
Association (APPA), Edison Electric Institute (EEI), and National Rural
Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). The assessment does not
support or recommend any particular course of action or advocate any
particular policy or position on the part of APPA, EEI, or NRECA.

According to UWIG's executive director Charlie Smith: "This document is
a summary of the best information available from around the world on
what we currently know about integrating wind power plants into electric
utility systems. This summary was produced with the cooperation of the
three utility industry associations representing nearly 100 percent of
the utilities in the United States. The message is very positive; we
don't see any fundamental technical barriers at the present time to wind
penetrations of up to 20 percent of system peak demand, which is far
beyond where we are today."

Smith noted that the document focuses on wind's impacts on the operating
costs of the non-wind portion of the power system and on wind's impacts
on the system's electrical integrity. "The consensus view is that wind
power impacts can be managed with proper design and operation of the
system. There is still a lot of work to be done to get the message
across and get everyone up the learning curve, but we are well on the
way."

The Utility Wind Integration Group (UWIG) was established in 1989 to
provide a forum for the critical analysis of wind technology for utility
applications and to serve as a source of credible information on the
status of wind technology and deployment. The group's mission is to
accelerate the appropriate integration of wind power for utility
applications through the coordinated efforts and actions of its members,
in collaboration with The U.S. Department of Energy, its National
Renewable Energy Laboratory and utility research organizations. UWIG's
membership spans investor-owned, public power, and rural electric
cooperative utilities; transmission system operators; and associate
member corporate, government, and academic organizations.

COMMENTARY: Renewable energy standard will clean up Minn.
----------------------------------------
The Minnesota Senate recently passed an omnibus energy bill that included a
provision to increase the amount of electricity generated from renewable
sources such as wind, solar energy and biomass. Source: Duluth News Tribune
(5/18)

                                                                            
 (Embedded                                                                  
 image moved   Press Releases                                               
 to file:                                                                   
 pic26924.gif) Homeland Security policy puts Wisconsin Windpower projects   
               in jeopardy                                                  
                                                                            
                                                                            
               RENEW Wisconsin                                              
                                                                            
               5/11/2006                                                    
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
               Homeland Security Policy Puts Wisconsin Windpower Projects   
               in Jeopardy                                                  
                                                                            
                                                                            
               A recently adopted requirement on the Department of Defense  
               to study and report on the effects of windpower              
               installations on military readiness has mutated into an      
               open-ended stop-work order on projects in Wisconsin,         
               according to RENEW Wisconsin Executive Director Michael      
               Vickerman.                                                   
                                                                            
                                                                            
               Enacted in January 6, the National Defense Authorization Act 
               for Fiscal Year 2006 instructed the Department of Defense    
               (DOD) to assess the effects of wind energy installations on  
               nearby military radar installations and submit a report      
               within 120 days. In its report to Congress, which was due    
               last week, DOD was specifically ordered to study the         
               potential for adverse effects as well as mitigation measures 
               that can remedy interference that can result from radar      
               signals bouncing off spinning blades.                        
                                                                            
                                                                            
               By all accounts, the original Congressional language was     
               aimed at one project. However, DOD and the Department of     
               Homeland Security (DHS) have decided to expand upon the      
               original study directive and apply it to all proposed        
               windpower installations in the United States. On March 21,   
               2006, the two agencies circulated an Interim Policy on       
               Proposed Windmill Farm Locations, stating that “[t]he        
               DOD/DHS ... Interim Policy is to contest any establishment   
               of windmill farms within radar line of the National Air      
               Defense and Homeland Security Radars. This is to remain in   
               effect until the completion of the study and publishing of   
               the Congressional Report.” (See accompanying policy          
               statement from the American Wind Energy Association)         
                                                                            
                                                                            
               There are pending in Wisconsin proposals to build more than  
               a dozen wind generation facilities. They range in size from  
               single-turbine installations to large wind farms numbering   
               over 100 turbines, for a combined total of 900 megawatts     
               (see accompanying wind project summary table). The path to   
               permit requires project developers to obtain from the        
               Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) a notice stating that  
               the installation is not a hazard to air navigation. Until    
               this year obtaining FAA clearance for wind projects was      
               strictly routine.                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
               Since the new DOD/DHS policy took effect, however, the FAA   
               has issued Notices of Presumed Hazard to several Midwestern  
               wind projects under development, including four in           
               Wisconsin, effectively halting their further development.    
               Among the projects held in abeyance are Midwest Wind         
               Energy’s Butler Ridge in eastern Dodge County and            
               Invenergy’s Forward Wind Center in Fond du Lac and Dodge     
               counties. These two projects, totaling 250 MW, have received 
               all necessary state and local permits to proceed with        
               construction. Other Wisconsin projects, including We         
               Energies’ 88-turbine Blue Sky/Green Field installation, are  
               likely to run afoul of the FAA’s clampdown unless the        
               DOD/DHS Interim Policy is modified or rescinded.             
                                                                            
                                                                            
               RENEW Wisconsin is very concerned that this policy will lead 
               to lost revenues and job opportunities communities expecting 
               to host wind projects. Furthermore, this de facto moratorium 
               comes just when Wisconsin utilities are preparing to invest  
               in new renewable energy sources, as required under the       
               recently enacted Act 141. Until this barrier emerged,        
               utilities had planned to procure a substantial portion of    
               this new energy from windpower, the lowest-cost source of    
               renewable electricity available .                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
               Katie Nekola, energy program director for Clean Wisconsin,   
               said: “This is the worst possible time to place roadblocks   
               in the way of wind development, when Wisconsin is making     
               critical decisions about building new generation. Wind       
               energy is by far the best choice we have, and has to be an   
               available option.”                                           
                                                                            
                                                                            
               RENEW Wisconsin’s Michael Vickerman issued the following     
               statement on the DOD/DHS Interim Policy:                     
                                                                            
                                                                            
               “It is not clear what criteria the FAA is using to contest   
               these proposed windpower installations. What is more, the    
               DOD study is already behind schedule and may not be          
               completed until the fall. Both factors have combined to      
               paralyze wind development efforts in Wisconsin and other     
               Midwestern states. And if this de facto moratorium persists  
               through the summer months, it may not be possible to build a 
               wind project here in time to capture the federal tax credits 
               which were extended last August through the end of 2007. The 
               direct and indirect economic damage that will accrue from a  
               one-year suspension of wind farm construction in Wisconsin   
               will easily reach the tens of millions of dollars. Coal and  
               natural gas must be imported in Wisconsin to make up for the 
               lost wind generation, resulting in higher energy costs and   
               more air pollution.”                                         
                                                                            
                                                                            
               “It must be noted that a number of U.S. government           
               installations have both wind turbines and functional radar,  
               and the British military has a track record of successfully  
               addressing this challenge. Notwithstanding its concern over  
               “clutter” on radars caused by wind turbines, the British     
               military was able to reach an accommodation with the wind    
               industry there without stifling wind farm construction in    
               large stretches of territory. What is the justification then 
               for DOD/DHS’s perverse policy of blanket opposition to wind  
               projects unlucky enough to be within the tracking area of    
               one radar installation? Why is the British Ministry of       
               Defense so resilient on this issue and its U.S. counterpart  
               so feeble by contrast?”                                      
                                                                            
                                                                            
               “Whatever its intentions may have been, Congress surely did  
               not envision bringing the wind industry to a standstill      
               while the DOD study drags on beyond the statutorily mandated 
               deadline. But in a time when satisfying America’s voracious  
               energy appetite has become the principal objective of U.S.   
               foreign policy, Congress must not allow this example of      
               agency overkill to cripple the development of domestically   
               available renewable energy resources like wind. The          
               economic, environmental and energy security benefits that    
               windpower delivers to Wisconsin and the other 49 states are  
               too great to be sacrificed needlessly on the altar of        
               national security. “                                         
                                                                            
                                                                            
               “Put another way, if windpower is allowed to be thwarted on  
               the dubious presumption that military radar operations would 
               be irreparably compromised, then we have no choice but to    
               conclude that the terrorists have already won the war.”      
                                                                            
               NPR : Gulf Energy Purveyors Get Second Wind                  
               http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5387574 
                                                                            
               Potential of radar-based Decision Support Systems to turn    
               off turbines to help minimize impacts to wildlife.           
               *Listen to this story*                                       
               Please click on the headline to the story using a RealAudio  
               or WindowsMedia player.                                      
               http://www.npr.org/help/index.html?showdiv=100               
               *Order a text transcript of this story*                      
               http://www.npr.org/transcripts/                              
                                                                            
               Wind power grows briskly                                     
               ----------------------------------------                     
               Minnesota is on track to add at least 128.2 megawatts of new 
               wind power in 2006                                           
               in what's expected to be another record-breaking year for    
               the overall U.S.                                             
               wind-energy industry. Source: St. Paul Pioneer Press (5/5)   
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            
                                                                            









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