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GLIN==> UPCOMING COASTAL HYPOXIA SEMINARS



We have scheduled two seminars for the NOAA/ University of Michigan Coastal Hypoxia Seminar Series for the week of 11/13. Please find the details listed below.

1) Speaker: Dr. Eugene Turner, Lousiana State University

Title: "Linking landscape and water quality in the Mississippi River basin for 200 years "

Date: Tuesday, November 14

Time: 10:30 AM

Location: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 2205 Commonwealth Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48105

Abstract
The world’s second largest zone of coastal hypoxia (oxygen depleted waters usually without marine organisms) is on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf, adjacent to the outflows of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Decades of research, monitoring and retrospective analysis support the conclusion that land use in the watershed is reflected in the ecology of the continental shelf. Nitrogen loading in the Mississippi River at New Orleans is moving towards a situation encouraging N and Si limitation. This result will likely alter phytoplankton community composition, and may compromise diatom -> zooplankton -> fish food webs. It is clear that nitrogen reductions in the sub-basins of the upper Midwest will be a key to the success of government polices to reduce hypoxia, and scientists are playing a unique and important role in informing this policy process. The Action Plan developed by State, Federal and Tribal entitles identifies a quantitative goal for a reduced hypoxic zone -- a 30% reduction in the nitrogen load. The Plan recognizes that all nitrogen sources should be included in the strategy and includes other nutrients. However, because 74% of the nitrate load is from agricultural non-point sources, and because 56% of the total nitrate load comes from north of the Ohio River, it is clear that nitrogen reductions in the sub-basins of the upper Midwest will be a key to its implementation.



2) Speaker: Dr. Steve Lozano, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory


Title: "Empirical assessments of Lake Erie ecological conditions"

Date: Thursday, November 16

Time: 10:30 AM

Location: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 2205 Commonwealth Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48105

Abstract
There are a multitude of stressors that impact the Lake Erie ecosystem. Some stressors have been a part of the ecosystem for centuries (hypoxia), decades (nutrients), and years (exotic species). In my presentation, I will present several statistical modeling techniques that will allow an understanding of the impact of environmental stressors based on an integration of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystem levels. I will compile and evaluate a time series of data on physical habitat and benthic surveys from 1967 to 2004. These data represent a period before and after the invasion of dreissenid mussels. The proposed analyses should improve our understanding of the impacts of hypoxia and exotic species invasion on benthic ecosystems.


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If you have any questions or concerns, please email me at kanika.suri@noaa.gov; or call 734-741-2147.

For more information about the seminar series, please visit our website at http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/




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Kanika Suri
Web Designer Associate

NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
2205 Commonwealth Blvd.,
Ann Arbor, MI
48105

Tel: (734) 741-2147
Fax: (734) 741-2055

www.glerl.noaa.gov

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