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Re: Calcium Fluoride Sludge Use




     Ric,
     
     For the wastewater treatment, don't try sodium or potassium.  Neither 
     of these will precipitate fluoride.  From my experience calcium is the 
     best treatment choice for fluoride.
     
     Rob Michalowicz
     BOVAR ENVIRONMENTAL
     robert_michalowicz@bovar.com 


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Calcium Fluoride Sludge Use
Author:  p2tech@great-lakes.net at INTERNET
Date:    2/7/97 7:03 AM


    FROM: R. Illig
X-ccAdmin: postmaster@daffy
     
    RE: Calcium Fluoride Sludge  and
        Hydrofluoric Acid for Etching Glass
     
    E-MAIL: illig.richard@a1.dep.state.pa.us
     
     
    One and All,
     
    1)  I too would be very interested in alternate uses, or users, 
    for calcium fluoride sludge...pending full analysis of the sludge 
    of course.  I have a site visit coming up next week and that is 
    one of the waste streams needing addressed.
     
    I request that anyone answering the earlier request for 
    information on CaF copy me and/or post the response to the list.
     
     
    2)  About a month ago, I requested information on any known 
    methods for etching glass that would avoid the use of hydrofluoric 
    acid (a better means for eliminating generation of the calcium 
    fluoride sludge).  Unfortunately, the best, and only, response I 
    received was not applicable, and involved the use of abrasive 
    material.  I'm rather sure a chemical etching process would be 
    needed (the inside of a glass (light) bulb is the object needing 
    etched).
     
    Assumming I'm stuck with the hydrofluoric acid for etching, my 
    next thought was to study the waste treatment system.  A 
    significant drop in the molecular weight of the sludge MAY be 
    possible by looking for replacements for the calcium source.  
    Sodium, potassium, or other lighter elements that have similar 
    chemical properties may allow for substitution of the calcium 
    material.  Am I dreaming (about dead chickens) or does this seem 
    like a worthy P2 method for attacking the problem?
     
    Any takers??
     
    As usual, thank you for any consideration.
     
    Ric